The Best Schools Near Pett

These are the top 10 primary and secondary schools near Pett ordered by their Ofsted inspection rating then name. To compare all schools near Pett in more detail use our intuitive schools map,where you can see parent reviews, catchment areas, exam results, league tables and much more.

School Inspection Rating Type Pupils Ages
Guestling Bradshaw Church of England Primary School
Rye Road, Guestling, Hastings, East Sussex, TN35 4LS
Good Primary 219 (51% boys 49% girls) 5-11
Information about this school

Guestling is a smaller-than-average primary school. Almost all pupils are of White British heritage. The proportion of pupils eligible for pupil premium support (additional money allocated to schools by the government) is average. The proportion of pupils who are disabled or have special educational needs supported through school action is below average. The proportion of pupils supported through school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs is average. The school meets the government’s floor standards, which set the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. Teaching has improved since the last inspection and is now good. Some teaching is outstanding. Pupils achieve well across all subjects, although progress in writing and mathematics is not as rapid as in reading. Pupils behave well and have positive attitudes to learning which contribute well to their good achievement in lessons and above average attendance. Pupils feel safe because staff look after them well and help sort out any problems quickly. School leaders and the governing body have a very good understanding of how well different groups of pupils are achieving. They make sure that any training for staff is closely linked to improving pupils’ achievement. Leadership of English and mathematics across the school is strong. The curriculum is well planned and provides a wide range of activities which pupils enjoy. Pupils have many opportunities to use their reading, writing and mathematical skills across different subjects. It is not yet an outstanding school because : Some more able pupils do not achieve as well as they can in mathematics because teachers do not always provide work which is hard enough. Opportunities for pupils to explain their reasoning in mathematics are limited. Teachers’ marking does not always make it clear to pupils how they can improve their written work. Subject leaders, other than those of English and mathematics, are not always able to manage their areas of responsibility well enough.
Icklesham Church of England Primary School
High Fords, Icklesham, Winchelsea, East Sussex, TN36 4BX
Good Primary 121 (45% boys 55% girls) 4-11
Information about this school

Icklesham Church of England Primary School is a smaller-than-average school with 116 pupils. There are four classes from Reception to Year 6. All pupils are taught in mixed-age classes. The large majority of pupils are from a White British background. The proportions of pupils from minority ethnic backgrounds, and who speak English as an additional language, are well below average. There are very few pupils who are disabled or have special educational needs. Very few pupils are supported by pupil premium (extra government funding for pupils known to be eligible for free school meals or who are looked after). All children in the Reception class attend full time. The school is part of the Rye Partnership of schools and the Hastings Alliance of schools. The school meets the government’s floor standards, which set the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. Icklesham Church of England Primary School is a happy and welcoming school. The environment is well ordered with a calm and purposeful atmosphere. Senior leaders have high expectations of pupils. Pupils know this and always try to do their best Pupils, including those who are disabled or have special educational needs and those who are disadvantaged, make good progress. Their reading is particularly strong. In the most recent tests at the end of Key Stage 2, all pupils made expected progress across all subjects and above-average progress in reading and writing. Children get off to a good start in the Early Years Foundation Stage. They are generally confident and enthusiastic and are keen to learn. They benefit from good relationships and begin to develop their social skills effectively. Teaching is typically good and some is outstanding. Classroom displays are vibrant and support pupils’ learning well. Pupils are particularly proud of their well-presented work. The headteacher’s vision for the school clearly supports good behaviour. Pupils behave well, are caring of each other and are courteous and kind. They know they are safe and move around the school in a safe and sensible manner. Leaders regularly check the quality of teaching and ensure that pupils who find learning difficult receive support to help them make progress. All pupils are given time daily to make sure that they have understood what they have learnt. The effective governing body and staff work closely as a team. Their priorities for the school are clear. This contributes to the success of the pupils in this improving school. It is not yet an outstanding school because : Teachers do not always give the most able pupils work which is challenging enough. Pupils are not consistently encouraged to develop their understanding in mathematics. Pupils do not always produce the best work they can do in writing. Sometimes teachers do not give less able pupils work at the right level of difficulty for them to achieve well. Not enough is done to encourage pupils to use correct grammar and spellings in their work.
St Thomas’ Church of England Aided Primary School
Friars Road, Winchelsea, East Sussex, TN36 4ED
Good Primary 151 (47% boys 53% girls) 5-11
Information about this school

The school is much smaller than the average-sized primary school. There are five mixed age classes. Almost all pupils are from a White British background. The proportion of disabled pupils and those with special educational needs supported through school action, school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs is very small and below the national average. The proportion of pupils funded by the pupil premium is small and well below the national average. This is additional government funding to give extra support for pupils known to be eligible for free school meals and to children who are looked after. The early years provision is full time. The headteacher is a Local Leader of Education. She is currently supporting another school. The school meets the government’s current floor standards, which set out the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress in English and mathematics. There have been several changes in staff since the previous inspection. A new deputy headteacher was appointed in April 2014.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. The headteacher and the governing body, fully supported by the staff, are determined to pursue excellence across all areas of school life. The headteacher is decisive in her actions to improve the quality of teaching and learning. Pupils enjoy learning and make good progress in all classes. Standards in reading, writing and mathematics at the end of Year 2 and Year 6 are above those found nationally. Teaching is effective in all classes. Teachers have a good understanding of how children learn and are adept at planning lessons that accurately meet pupils’ needs. They are skilled at managing the mixed age ranges within each class to ensure all pupils make good progress. Pupils are kept safe and are well looked after. They respond by working hard and behaving well. Good use is made of extra government funding to support disadvantaged pupils to succeed highly. Any gaps in achievement between this group and all pupils are very small and closing. Parents are very supportive of the school and think their children make good progress in a safe and happy environment. As a result, attendance has improved and is now average. The early years provision is good. Children make good use of the inspirational classroom and outside area to explore and develop their skills. They have highly positive attitudes to learning. The experienced governing body provides strong support and effective challenge to the headteacher to ensure standards and progress continue to improve. It is not yet an outstanding school because : The highest quality of teaching is not always shared widely enough to ensure all teachers continually improve their practice. Opportunities for pupils to respond to comments teachers make about their work are not consistent in all classes. A few parents are still not ensuring their child attends school every day.
The Hastings Academy
Rye Road, Hastings, East Sussex, TN35 5DN
Good Academy 860 (58% boys 42% girls) 11-16
Information about this school

The academy is part of the University of Brighton Academies Trust. It works in close partnership with St Leonards Academy and they share the same local governance board. The principal was appointed, after a short period as acting principal, permanently to the role in April 2017. The number of disadvantaged pupils supported by pupil premium funding is well above the national average. The school currently meets the government’s floor standards for achievement at key stage 4. The proportion of pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities is higher than the national average. The school accommodates a specialist resource centre for a small number of pupils with speech, language and communication difficulties, which is funded by the local authority. Around 40 pupils, of whom 31 are part time, attend alternative learning providers including Personalised Foundation for Learning, College Central, Education Futures Trust, YMCA, Plumpton College and Sussex Coast College.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school This is a rapidly improving school. The principal has transformed the school since his recent appointment, by raising the whole school community’s expectations of what pupils can achieve. Parents, staff and pupils all agree that there has been a sharp improvement in all aspects of school life. Exceptional leadership and a clear sense of moral purpose at all levels drive strong ambition. The University of Brighton Academies Trust provides good support and challenge to school leaders. Pupils are proud to belong to The Hastings Academy and are now thriving and making good progress in the new ambitious culture. Parents are extremely positive about their child’s experience at the school. The school is over subscribed. Teaching has improved rapidly. The principal has acted swiftly to recruit and retain good teachers. Leaders have made sure that reading is a priority. Pupils read regularly and many say they love reading. Leaders ensure that disadvantaged pupils are very well supported and so make the same or better progress than other pupils. Pupils are happy and say they are safe. The school’s safeguarding procedures are highly effective. Leaders make very good use of achievement information to check on pupils’ progress. They take prompt action should they find any underachievement. Pupils’ behaviour has improved markedly. Their behaviour is good in lessons and around the school. They are polite, well mannered and courteous. Pupils who have special educational needs (SEN) and/or disability are supported well and make good progress. The speech language and communication unit is very effective in meeting pupils’ communication needs. There are small pockets of less effective teaching, particularly in English, because : teaching does not match pupils’ needs well enough. Leaders know that there are still improvements to make in boys’ reading and writing skills. Most-able pupils are not always given work that challenges them enough. While attendance has improved, there are still a small number of pupils who do not attend regularly enough.