Ashdene Independent Pre-School

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About Ashdene Independent Pre-School


Name Ashdene Independent Pre-School
Inspections
Ofsted Inspections
Address Thoresway Road, Wilmslow, Cheshire, SK9 6LJ
Type Childcare on Non-Domestic Premises, Full day care
Gender Mixed
Local Authority CheshireEast
Highlights from Latest Inspection

What is it like to attend this early years setting?

The provision is good

Children thrive in the pre-school. They have positive relationships with staff.

For example, children learn about healthy eating as they make their own fruit smoothies. When anxious about the loud noise from the blender, children readily receive cuddles and reassurance from staff. Children are happy and safe.

Children experience lots of engaging learning opportunities. For example, they learn about different kinds of animals when they are brought to visit the pre-school. Children learn about people who help them when police and firefighters visit.

A large outdoor space is designed to support children's learnin...g. Children have opportunities to develop their physical skills as they climb and run. They practise mark making and early writing on a large chalkboard.

Children make their own choices and guide their own play as they move freely between the inside and outside areas. Staff set high expectations for children, which helps their knowledge and skills to develop over time.Children behave well.

They follow instructions and understand the boundaries put in place for them. Children are kind and friendly towards one another. They show a high level of respect for others.

Since the COVID-19 pandemic, children leave their parents at the door. They enter happily, eager to play and learn.

What does the early years setting do well and what does it need to do better?

Teaching is of a high quality.

Staff know children well and focus activities on what children need to learn next. For example, staff teach children the starting sounds of words. All children, including those with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND) make good progress in their learning.

Mathematics is embedded throughout the day. For example, staff help children to count and encourage them to compare the weights of different objects. Children enjoy singing songs, such as 'Five currant buns'.

Staff provide knitted buns and physical numbers. This supports children's understanding of mathematical concepts.Children usually behave well.

For example, during circle time, children listen intently and take turns. However, occasionally children become unsettled during times of transition. For example, children are restless as they have to wait for others to finish their lunch.

This hinders children's ability to behave well.Children develop superb independence skills as they go to the on-site school for lunch. They choose which hot meal they would like and politely ask the catering staff for it.

Children carry their own trays to the table. During lunchtime, children communicate and socialise with their friends. This helps to support a smooth transition when children move on to school.

Children learn the language of emotions. For example, they are invited to share how they are feeling as they talk about the book 'The Colour Monster'. Children are reassured that it is okay to have different feelings.

They talk about what they could do to help each other to feel better if they are feeling sad. This helps to build children's self-esteem as they become confident in expressing themselves.Equality and diversity is celebrated.

Children share books about different cultures and types of families. People who celebrate different festivals, such as Diwali, visit pre-school to share their experiences. Children learn to appreciate each other's differences and celebrate their individuality.

Stereotypes are challenged and staff promote children's understanding by encouraging them to ask questions, which staff answer openly. This helps to prepare children for life in modern Britain.The pre-school committee has good oversight and provides effective support to management.

Managers monitor staff practice to ensure it is of a high standard. Staff attend a variety of training to support them in their roles, such as food hygiene and oral health. The well-qualified staff team contributes to the high-quality education being provided.

Parents are extremely happy with the pre-school. They praise the support for children with SEND and links with the local school. Parents receive regular communication and are invited into the pre-school for parents' evenings to discuss children's progress.

The pre-school sends home borrow bags to help promote continuity in children's learning.

Safeguarding

The arrangements for safeguarding are effective.The pre-school is secure and staff take regular action to minimise risk to children.

For example, before children enter the garden, staff check that it is secured and safe. Staff have good knowledge of signs of abuse and how to report any concerns they have. They have prompts on lanyards to help remind them of key information.

The number of children present is checked and updated every thirty minutes to help ensure all children are accounted for. The pre-school only allows children supervised access to technology, which helps to keep children safe from online dangers.

What does the setting need to do to improve?

To further improve the quality of the early years provision, the provider should: reflect on times of transition, so that children do not spend too long waiting.