Bumblebees Playgroup

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About Bumblebees Playgroup


Name Bumblebees Playgroup
Inspections
Ofsted Inspections
Address Appenine Way, Leighton Buzzard, Bedfordshire, LU7 3AJ
Type Childcare on Non-Domestic Premises, Sessional day care
Gender Mixed
Local Authority CentralBedfordshire
Highlights from Latest Inspection

What is it like to attend this early years setting?

The provision is good

The manager and staff have created a very inviting environment where children use mostly naturally sourced equipment and resources. They closely examine the effectiveness and safety of all resources and activities.

They rigorously evaluate practice to ensure children enjoy memorable and rewarding experiences.Children have fun together. For example, they harvest apples from a dwarf apple tree in the outdoor learning area.

Under the guidance and supervision of staff, they independently work out how to succeed as a team and keep one another safe.As staff pose questions and make suggestions, children become inquisitive to ...find answers. For example, children explore the shapes, textures and scents of different herbs.

They practise using cutting tools safely to give the herbs 'haircuts'. They make herbal infusions and learn which plants are safe to eat. They remove plants from pots and investigate what holds the plant in the soil.

Children behave very well. They join in decision-making and understand the rules. Staff get children to explain boundaries at the start of each session to ensure children understand how to keep themselves and each other safe.

Parents praise the methods that the setting employs. They say their children learn to manage themselves with increased confidence, and they are safe and happy at the setting.

What does the early years setting do well and what does it need to do better?

The management team has a deep knowledge and understanding of the early years foundation stage.

It leads a committed team of staff to work insightfully for children's development.Staff use children's interests and inquisitiveness to develop plans. In the room for two-year-olds, staff and parents list each child's interests.

Each child has a key person who constantly checks their progress and adjusts teaching for maximum impact. All children make good progress, including those with special educational needs.Staff have a clear knowledge and understanding of how children learn.

They guide children to make small steps to build success quickly. For example, when children paint a bridge, a staff member asks what goes 'under' and 'over' each bridge. This helps children develop language skills and think through how things work.

Children frequently share books and become attentive listeners. They listen carefully and join in with refrains in songs and stories.During different activities, children develop precise muscle control towards holding a pencil correctly for writing.

Children learn the sounds that letters represent and how to write their names. They are well prepared for the next stage in their education.Staff speak kindly and considerately to children.

Their exceptionally positive attitudes help children feel emotionally secure. Staff share and celebrate children's achievements. Children are motivated and sustain concentration.

Staff encourage children to choose for themselves from a very young age. Staff recently evaluated how resources are stored and have reorganised systems so children can easily access popular resources. Children respect and maintain the well-organised environment.

Children get fresh air and exercise in the outdoor area. They enthusiastically extend their physical skills on large play equipment. Older children choose whether to scale the wall or use stairs to the slide.

Younger children challenge themselves with balancing bars or walking on stilts.Children develop life skills in well-organised role-play areas. They dress up as firefighters and pretend to drive a fire engine.

Older children set out a pretend tea party. They count plates and cups for visitors. Children use good-quality items and treat them with great care.

They feel trusted and valued.Staff encourage and help children to meet their own personal needs as soon as they are ready. Children learn to take rests when needed.

They learn to look after themselves, each other and the environment.The management team carries out detailed observations and supervisions to target training and ensure staff always know how well they are progressing towards well-defined goals.The manager works with other professionals as part of her continuous improvement plans.

Following recent training, staff now have a more in-depth knowledge of how to help young children gain confidence in their speaking skills.Staff do not consistently use all opportunities to extend children's mathematical knowledge and skills during activities.

Safeguarding

The arrangements for safeguarding are effective.

All staff understand their responsibilities in relation to child protection issues very well. They know how to report any child welfare concerns to the relevant professionals. Staff receive regular up-to-date training.

All staff receive a thorough induction and are vetted closely to confirm their suitability to work with children. All activities and visits are stringently risk assessed to ensure children are safe.

What does the setting need to do to improve?

To further improve the quality of the early years provision, the provider should: nimprove teaching to develop children's mathematical skills further.