The Academy at Almondbury


Name The Academy at Almondbury
Ofsted Inspection Rating Outstanding
Address 211 Southfield Road, Huddersfield, HD5 8RJ
Type Childcare on Non-Domestic Premises, Full day care
Gender Mixed
Local Authority Kirklees
Catchment Area Indicator Available No
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (26 February 2020)
There may have been more recent inspections such as monitoring visits or short inspections. For details of all inspections, please view this provider on our map here.

What is it like to attend this early years setting?

The provision is outstanding

Children are exceptionally happy and secure at this nurturing setting. Staff know children extremely well and have strong relationships with them. Staff talk to children about their pets and family as they eat lunch together. Children respond eagerly, displaying exemplary social skills. The manager and staff create an exciting curriculum that develops children’s skills across all areas of learning. As a result, children gain the necessary skills to prepare them for the next stage of their education. Children are enthralled by the adventures of their gingerbread man and the postcards he sends from around the world. They discuss where he might have been and how he got there. This develops their imaginations and communication and language skills. Staff skilfully support children’s critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Children use these skills as their interest in hibernation develops into a fascination with building tunnels. Children’s behaviour is exemplary. They are kind and caring towards each other. Children help each other to match objects to letter sounds, and toddlers gently rub the backs of their sleeping friends. Children learn about keeping themselves and others safe. They remind each other of the rules as they sit around a candle during reflection time. Children are proud of their nursery. They delight in taking the inspector on a tour of their environment, confidently talking about what they enjoy learning.

What does the early years setting do well and what does it need to do better?

Through exceptional teaching, staff build on what children already know and can do. They extend these skills as children progress through the nursery. For example, staff support toddlers to select their own snack using tongs. Older children develop their independence and physical skills even further. They serve themselves chicken and vegetables and clear away their own plates at lunchtime. Support for children with special educational needs and/or disabilities is exemplary. Purpose-built equipment allows children of all abilities to develop and practise their climbing skills.Children’s understanding of the wider world is supported superbly through rich life experiences. Children enjoy exploring new tastes at a Chinese restaurant, and visits to the theatre. They learn about the needs of others when they take part in a charity walk and have a visit from a guide dog.Children are well supported in their emotional development. During reflection time, children are encouraged to talk about their feelings. Through skilful questioning, staff help children to think about and express why they may be feeling a certain way.Children have excellent communication and language skills. Staff model language well, encouraging children to talk. Children talk openly about their sadness over the loss of the nursery rabbit. Staff expertly support children, helping them to develop the vocabulary to express their grief.Children display high levels of positive behaviour. They are extremely respectful of each other. They willingly take turns with dressing-up equipment and share resources as they make robots.Children have a love of reading and sharing books. Babies smile and babble as staff read to them. Older children enthusiastically join in a shared reading session. They concentrate intently as they turn the pages, follow the words with their finger and join in with repeated phrases. Staff skilfully build children’s understanding of number. Staff count ’one, two, three’ with the babies as they scoop three ladles of water. Toddlers count fruit, matching each piece to a number up to five. Older children confidently count and order numbered cups to 10.The manager uses her extensive early years knowledge and skills to deliver the best possible outcomes for all children. She gives staff the time and support to improve their professional practice. The manager ensures staff have a deep understanding of the early years curriculum and what impact this has on children’s learning.Exemplary partnerships with other professionals ensure a consistent approach to children’s learning. Work with local schools helps prepare all children for the transition. Staff work closely with parents to help children with key events in their lives. For example, staff suggest specific activities to help children prepare for the arrival of a baby. Parents are exceptionally happy with how their children are cared for and the progress they make.

Safeguarding

The arrangements for safeguarding are effective.Children’s safety and well-being are a high priority. The manager places a strong focus on ensuring that staff knowledge of safeguarding remains up to date, including their work with other agencies. For example, the setting is involved in a scheme with an outside agency to learn more about how to safeguard children from domestic abuse. Staff have a secure knowledge of local multi-agency reporting arrangements. They know how to respond to concerns about staff practice. Staff help children learn how to manage their own safety. They talk to them about e-safety and encourage parents to keep their children safe online at home.