Clapham and Patching CofE Primary School

About Clapham and Patching CofE Primary School Browse Features

Clapham and Patching CofE Primary School


Name Clapham and Patching CofE Primary School
Website http://WWW.claphamandpatching.co.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Address The Street, Clapham, Worthing, BN13 3UU
Phone Number 01903871214
Type Academy
Age Range 4-11
Religious Character Church of England
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 30 (50% boys 50% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 14
Academy Sponsor South Downs Education Trust
Local Authority West Sussex
Percentage Free School Meals 30%
Percentage English is Not First Language 3.2%
Persistent Absence 25.4%
Pupils with SEN Support 33.9%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (12 November 2019)
There may have been more recent inspections such as monitoring visits or short inspections. For details of all inspections, please view this provider on our map here.
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.

What is it like to attend this school?

This is a small school where all have high expectations for every pupil. Staff and governors are determined that everyone will do the best they can. This includes pupils with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND). Everyone is focused on pupils? best interests.

Pupils are happy and safe. Adults take time to know each pupil and care for them as individuals. Pupils follow adults? examples and look after each other. For example, when a young girl fell over in the playground, I saw an older pupil quickly help her to her feet and check that she was unhurt. Pupils also behave well in lessons. They listen to adults and work well with their classmates.

There are, at times, fallings-out among pupils, but these are infrequent and quickly sorted out. Pupils know the difference between occasional thoughtlessness and bullying. They know exactly what to do if bullying does happen but say that it is rare.

Parents and carers are full of praise for everything that is being done to help their children to flourish. Parents who moved their children from other schools are particularly positive. They have seen their children become much more successful in school.

What does the school do well and what does it need to do better?

The headteacher, teachers and governors have designed a curriculum to meet the needs of pupils. It covers the national curriculum, but also uses the local area to bring learning to life. It is planned carefully so that pupils, including those with SEND, build knowledge and skills over time.

Reading sits at the heart of the curriculum. Wherever you look in the school, there are books attractively displayed. One teacher explained, ?If you learn to read, you can do anything. Right from the time that children join Reception, they start on the journey to learn to read. Most pupils become confident, fluent readers. Those with SEND receive extra help and support to help them catch up and keep up. The curriculum in mathematics is also strong. It helps pupils to become confident and to improve their knowledge and skills as they move through the school.

The wider curriculum enables pupils to achieve well. Teachers plan subjects carefully so that new ideas build on previous learning. Pupils achieve very well in art because teachers build pupils? skills over time. Teachers introduce pupils to different artists and art from diverse cultural backgrounds, including the Aborigines. In geography, teachers make sure that pupils remember earlier lessons before they move on to new learning. For example, older pupils were learning about the continent of Africa. The teacher first checked that pupils had remembered about the earth?s hemispheres and the equator. Pupils then went on to learn about the tropics and how to locate places using latitude and longitude.

Most subjects are planned and taught well. However, there is still work to be done to make sure that the curriculum is as consistently strong in all subjects. Weaker subjects include languages, and design and technology.

Everyone has high expectations for pupils? behaviour. As a result, pupils behave well both in school and at free times. Almost all pupils are well behaved and respectful. There are some pupils with SEND who provide the school with significant behaviour challenges. Staff manage these pupils effectively. Pupils want to do well, work hard and are proud of their achievements.

Leaders have focused on making sure that pupils attend regularly. As a result, attendance is improving, especially this year. However, some pupils are still absent without good reason. Leaders need to continue their work to improve attendance even more.

A wide range of activities supports pupils? wider development. They go on visits to exciting places. In particular, pupils love learning in the woodland area of the school. They learn valuable life lessons such as resilience and cooperation while having fun.

Children in the early years receive a strong start in school. Although they all come from different pre-school settings, they settle in quickly. Children are friendly, confident and articulate. They take turns and cooperate, sharing ideas and resources with each other. Children learn well indoors and outside because adults understand how to help children learn from play. Staff respond quickly to children?s interests. For example, a girl brought in a spider from outside. Before long, the teacher had children drawing pictures of spiders? webs and making models of spiders. Others were practising writing about their findings.

Safeguarding

The arrangements for safeguarding are effective.

There is a strong culture of safeguarding in the school and pupils are safe here. Staff have all received up-to-date training. They are vigilant to signs of harm, such as changes in a pupil?s appearance or behaviour. Staff report any concerns promptly.

Pupils learn to stay safe, including online. They know to keep personal information private and not to trust people unless they are completely certain who they are.

The administration of some aspects of safeguarding has not been strong until this academic year. The headteacher, supported by the local authority, has now sharpened the school?s record-keeping.

What does the school need to do to improve?

(Information for the school and appropriate authority)

The school?s curriculum helps pupils to learn well in most subjects because it is carefully sequenced and structured. However, the curriculum is not as strong in some subjects, such as languages and design and technology, as it is in most. The school should continue its work in developing the curriculum so that pupils can improve their knowledge and skills in all subjects. . Staff have worked hard to improve pupils? attendance. There is clear evidence that their efforts are starting to have positive results. Leaders and governors should continue to improve pupils? attendance.