From Boyhood To Manhood Foundation

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From Boyhood To Manhood Foundation


Name From Boyhood To Manhood Foundation
Website http://www.fbmf.org.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 15 November 2011
Address The Trinity Centre, 1 Newent Close, Camberwell, London, SE15 6EF
Phone Number 02035382525
Type Independent
Age Range 11-21
Religious Character None
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils Unknown
Local Authority Southwark
Catchment Area Information Available No
Last Distance Offered Information Available No

Information about the school

The From Boyhood to Manhood Foundation admits up to 30 secondary-aged girls and boys with behavioural, social and emotional difficulties. It opened in 2003. The school has applied to the Department for Education (DfE) to accept girls as it was originally registered for boys only. The DfE has agreed that girls can be admitted. It is housed in a single-storey rented church hall near Camberwell Green in the London Borough of Southwark. It has begun to re-admit pupils after a two-year period when premises were being refurbished. Currently no pupils have statements of special educational needs. Pupils are drawn from Southwark and neighbouring authorities such as Lambeth, Lewisham and Croydon. The school specifically admits pupils who have been, or will shortly be excluded from mainstream education. Pupils are dual-registered with mainstream schools or pupil referral units (PRUs). The school aims to reintegrate pupils back into education and help them to deal with the causes of their disruptive and anti-social behaviour. There are currently four pupils on roll, who have only been at the school for a short period of time. Most pupils are placed for a three-month assessment and intervention programme, where their needs are reviewed. The school has a mission to improve pupils’ educational and personal development. It works with the local schools, social services, police, youth and community workers and the Greater London Authority. The last inspection was in June 2007, when the school met all but one of the regulations. Evaluation of the school The school provides a good quality of education and fulfils its mission statement well. As a result of the good curriculum and effective teaching, pupils become more confident and articulate learners who make good progress and successfully re-engage with learning. Provision is particularly successful in promoting the moral and social aspects of the pupils’ personal development, which are good. All safeguarding requirements are met effectively. The school has addressed the regulation that it did not meet, from the previous inspection. It now meets all the regulations but one: it does not have suitable facilities for those who are ill. Quality of education The curriculum is good. Provision focuses well on the development of pupils’ basic skills and personal development in preparation for their return to mainstream school. The emphasis is on changing pupils’ attitudes and behaviour and preparing them to re-engage with learning, which the school does effectively. Weekly activities include self-development group work, anger management training and ‘key work’ where staff help individuals with personal issues. Well-structured careers and physical education programmes are in place. Provision also includes inter-personal skills work, mentoring, art, drama, music, photography and lifestyle management activities which meet pupils’ needs and interests well. Pupils are asked to sign a negotiated agreement based on their own needs before they start school so that they know what must be achieved. An individual learning plan is devised in consultation with the co-registered school, which is expected to provide study material. The curriculum aims to stimulate a positive attitude to learning and instil self-confidence in the pupils, which it effectively achieves. There is a strong emphasis on English and mathematics because achievement in these subjects is often underdeveloped. Suitable provision for science has been developed as recommended by the last inspection and pupils now attend science lessons, with support, in their main school. There is very effective provision for personal, social, health and citizenship education (PSHCE), which permeates the life of the school and involves the whole school community. In discussions in PSHCE, pupils learn various techniques which will help them to control and modify their behaviour. Pupils have regular opportunities to engage in a variety of physical activities, such as swimming and sport, which keep them fit and healthy. There are very good links with local secondary schools to facilitate pupils’ return and they can take national examinations in either school. A wide variety of workshops, curriculum related visits and visitors to the school stimulate learning and motivate pupils to learn. Representatives from industry, such as banking, are involved in programmes to re-engage the pupils. During the inspection a visit took place by the Mayor of Southwark who helped to extend pupils’ awareness of their black cultural heritage; other recent visitors include members of The Royal Court Theatre, who developed pupils’ communication skills through a drama workshop. There is no after-school extra-curricular provision, as pupils go home promptly at the end of the school day. Teaching and assessment are good. In the relatively short period of time that pupils have been in school they are making good progress in developing their basic skills and personal development. Provision is effective in improving pupils’ behaviour and attitudes to learning. Relationships between staff and pupils are positive. The initial focus of the teaching is on helping pupils to settle into their new environment and to ensure baseline assessments inform the planning of new work. Staff provide highly relevant activities in a calm and respectful atmosphere. The very small group size and much one-to-one teaching ensure that staff know each pupil well and this allows them to provide good support for individuals in need of help and guidance. As a result, pupils make good progress in achieving lesson objectives. They also feel safe and comfortable in lessons and their behaviour is managed well. The positive learning atmosphere helps pupils to focus and suitably engage in lessons. Through constant reinforcement of the school’s expectations, pupils are encouraged to behave well and to respect each other and their environment. On the whole they concentrate well, listen to staff and respond appropriately when asked questions. The school places a strong emphasis on raising the pupils’ self-esteem through the clearly understood system for rewards and sanctions. Pupils are encouraged to self-assess their behaviour, which helps them to develop their sense of responsibility and improve their behaviour. Teachers make good use of assessment to ensure that work is suitably matched to pupils’ capabilities. Feedback informs pupils about what they are expected to achieve by the end of each teaching session and staff regularly review pupils’ learning and behaviour. Evidence shows that the school’s behaviour management policies and practices are effective. The well-developed points system for rewarding good behaviour and attitudes, in which the pupils are involved, effectively motivates most pupils to complete their tasks. Spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of pupils The spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of the pupils is good. They are developing their understanding of right and wrong and respond positively to the staff, who provide excellent role models. Pupils’ behaviour and attendance during the short time they have been at the school are good. They are positive, as expressed by one pupil who said, ‘It’s better than my old school… it’s great.’ Pupils confirm that the school is helping them to learn to take more responsibility for their own behaviour. There are a simple set of school rules which emphasise the positive, and pupils respond to these well. Pupils follow the school’s code of conduct. Through the development of supportive relationships with staff, pupils gain an understanding of how to react when events become stressful. There are good opportunities for pupils to take responsibility as they progress through the school. Pupils develop an excellent awareness of their own and other cultures and this cultural mix of both staff and pupils is regularly celebrated. Racial harmony is very effectively promoted. Pupils leave the school better prepared for the next stage of their education and their future economic well-being through the effectiveness of the curriculum and through visits from, for example, the local community support officers and the police. Pupils develop a good understanding of public services and institutions in England through work in history, drama and current affairs and through well-chosen visits outside school. Welfare, health and safety of pupils Provision for welfare, health and safety is good. The school has devised and effectively implemented a full range of policies, which pay due regard to national guidance. These include anti-bullying, health and safety including visits outside school, behaviour and safeguarding. All staff, including the designated person for safeguarding, have been appropriately trained to fulfil their child protection responsibilities. The school assesses the risk of all activities inside the school and external visits effectively. Two staff are trained in first aid and accidents are appropriately recorded. Pupils are encouraged to eat healthily at breakfast in school, and lunch is usually taken in local restaurants, which helps the pupils to gain confidence and an awareness of life outside of their usual environment. Opportunities are available for regular exercise, including weekly sports and swimming, to keep pupils fit and healthy. The precautions for fire prevention are thorough. At the time of the last inspection the school did not provide a fire risk assessment. This weakness has been remedied and one is now in place with fire risk assessment overseen by a professional company. All fire appliances are checked annually and fire drills are undertaken regularly and formally recorded. The pupils are very well supervised at all times. The admission and attendance registers meet regulatory requirements. The school did not have a three-year accessibility plan at the last inspection. It has now devised and begun to implement a plan to fulfil its duties under the Equality Act 2010. Suitability of staff, supply staff and proprietors Procedures for checking the suitability of all staff and others are robust, and meet all requirements. The single central record is kept in accordance with regulatory requirements. Premises and accommodation at the school The premises and accommodation are satisfactory, secure, and enable pupils to learn safely and effectively. There are no facilities for physical education but the school makes very good use of local parks and sports centres. The school does not have suitable facilities for those who are ill. The school is currently looking for more suitable premises. Provision of information The school provides all parents, carers and others with clear, accurate and up-to-date information. All of the required information is provided, or made available, through the school prospectus and website. Well-written and regular reports are provided for parents and carers about their children’s progress. Parents and carers have frequent opportunities to meet staff to discuss their children’s progress. A parent trainer is available to assist parents and carers who may require additional support. The response to the pre-inspection questionnaire was positive. Parents, carers and a placing authority confirmed that pupils had settled in well, one commenting, ‘The programmes of support are tailored to suit young people’s individual needs… this school has already made a difference.’ Manner in which complaints are to be handled The school has a set of written procedures which meet regulatory requirements. Compliance with regulatory requirements The proprietor has ensured that the school meets The Education (Independent School Standards) (England) Regulations 2010, schedule 1 (‘the Regulations’), with the exception of those listed below.3 The school does not meet all requirements in respect of the premises of and accommodation at schools (standards in part 5) and must: 3 www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2010/1997/contents/made. ensure that there are appropriate facilities for pupils who are ill, in accordance with regulation 5 of the Education (School Premises) Regulations 1999 (paragraph (23k)). What the school could do to improve further While not required by regulations, the school might wish to consider the following points for development. Continue the search for more suitable premises to enable the pupils to enjoy good quality learning experiences in a more suitable environment.

Evaluation of the school

The school provides a good quality of education and fulfils its mission statement well. As a result of the good curriculum and effective teaching, pupils become more confident and articulate learners who make good progress and successfully re-engage with learning. Provision is particularly successful in promoting the moral and social aspects of the pupils’ personal development, which are good. All safeguarding requirements are met effectively. The school has addressed the regulation that it did not meet, from the previous inspection. It now meets all the regulations but one: it does not have suitable facilities for those who are ill. Quality of education The curriculum is good. Provision focuses well on the development of pupils’ basic skills and personal development in preparation for their return to mainstream school. The emphasis is on changing pupils’ attitudes and behaviour and preparing them to re-engage with learning, which the school does effectively. Weekly activities include self-development group work, anger management training and ‘key work’ where staff help individuals with personal issues. Well-structured careers and physical education programmes are in place. Provision also includes inter-personal skills work, mentoring, art, drama, music, photography and lifestyle management activities which meet pupils’ needs and interests well. Pupils are asked to sign a negotiated agreement based on their own needs before they start school so that they know what must be achieved. An individual learning plan is devised in consultation with the co-registered school, which is expected to provide study material. The curriculum aims to stimulate a positive attitude to learning and instil self-confidence in the pupils, which it effectively achieves. There is a strong emphasis on English and mathematics because achievement in these subjects is often underdeveloped. Suitable provision for science has been developed as recommended by the last inspection and pupils now attend science lessons, with support, in their main school. There is very effective provision for personal, social, health and citizenship education (PSHCE), which permeates the life of the school and involves the whole school community. In discussions in PSHCE, pupils learn various techniques which will help them to control and modify their behaviour. Pupils have regular opportunities to engage in a variety of physical activities, such as swimming and sport, which keep them fit and healthy. There are very good links with local secondary schools to facilitate pupils’ return and they can take national examinations in either school. A wide variety of workshops, curriculum related visits and visitors to the school stimulate learning and motivate pupils to learn. Representatives from industry, such as banking, are involved in programmes to re-engage the pupils. During the inspection a visit took place by the Mayor of Southwark who helped to extend pupils’ awareness of their black cultural heritage; other recent visitors include members of The Royal Court Theatre, who developed pupils’ communication skills through a drama workshop. There is no after-school extra-curricular provision, as pupils go home promptly at the end of the school day. Teaching and assessment are good. In the relatively short period of time that pupils have been in school they are making good progress in developing their basic skills and personal development. Provision is effective in improving pupils’ behaviour and attitudes to learning. Relationships between staff and pupils are positive. The initial focus of the teaching is on helping pupils to settle into their new environment and to ensure baseline assessments inform the planning of new work. Staff provide highly relevant activities in a calm and respectful atmosphere. The very small group size and much one-to-one teaching ensure that staff know each pupil well and this allows them to provide good support for individuals in need of help and guidance. As a result, pupils make good progress in achieving lesson objectives. They also feel safe and comfortable in lessons and their behaviour is managed well. The positive learning atmosphere helps pupils to focus and suitably engage in lessons. Through constant reinforcement of the school’s expectations, pupils are encouraged to behave well and to respect each other and their environment. On the whole they concentrate well, listen to staff and respond appropriately when asked questions. The school places a strong emphasis on raising the pupils’ self-esteem through the clearly understood system for rewards and sanctions. Pupils are encouraged to self-assess their behaviour, which helps them to develop their sense of responsibility and improve their behaviour. Teachers make good use of assessment to ensure that work is suitably matched to pupils’ capabilities. Feedback informs pupils about what they are expected to achieve by the end of each teaching session and staff regularly review pupils’ learning and behaviour. Evidence shows that the school’s behaviour management policies and practices are effective. The well-developed points system for rewarding good behaviour and attitudes, in which the pupils are involved, effectively motivates most pupils to complete their tasks. Spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of pupils The spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of the pupils is good. They are developing their understanding of right and wrong and respond positively to the staff, who provide excellent role models. Pupils’ behaviour and attendance during the short time they have been at the school are good. They are positive, as expressed by one pupil who said, ‘It’s better than my old school… it’s great.’ Pupils confirm that the school is helping them to learn to take more responsibility for their own behaviour. There are a simple set of school rules which emphasise the positive, and pupils respond to these well. Pupils follow the school’s code of conduct. Through the development of supportive relationships with staff, pupils gain an understanding of how to react when events become stressful. There are good opportunities for pupils to take responsibility as they progress through the school. Pupils develop an excellent awareness of their own and other cultures and this cultural mix of both staff and pupils is regularly celebrated. Racial harmony is very effectively promoted. Pupils leave the school better prepared for the next stage of their education and their future economic well-being through the effectiveness of the curriculum and through visits from, for example, the local community support officers and the police. Pupils develop a good understanding of public services and institutions in England through work in history, drama and current affairs and through well-chosen visits outside school. Welfare, health and safety of pupils Provision for welfare, health and safety is good. The school has devised and effectively implemented a full range of policies, which pay due regard to national guidance. These include anti-bullying, health and safety including visits outside school, behaviour and safeguarding. All staff, including the designated person for safeguarding, have been appropriately trained to fulfil their child protection responsibilities. The school assesses the risk of all activities inside the school and external visits effectively. Two staff are trained in first aid and accidents are appropriately recorded. Pupils are encouraged to eat healthily at breakfast in school, and lunch is usually taken in local restaurants, which helps the pupils to gain confidence and an awareness of life outside of their usual environment. Opportunities are available for regular exercise, including weekly sports and swimming, to keep pupils fit and healthy. The precautions for fire prevention are thorough. At the time of the last inspection the school did not provide a fire risk assessment. This weakness has been remedied and one is now in place with fire risk assessment overseen by a professional company. All fire appliances are checked annually and fire drills are undertaken regularly and formally recorded. The pupils are very well supervised at all times. The admission and attendance registers meet regulatory requirements. The school did not have a three-year accessibility plan at the last inspection. It has now devised and begun to implement a plan to fulfil its duties under the Equality Act 2010. Suitability of staff, supply staff and proprietors Procedures for checking the suitability of all staff and others are robust, and meet all requirements. The single central record is kept in accordance with regulatory requirements. Premises and accommodation at the school The premises and accommodation are satisfactory, secure, and enable pupils to learn safely and effectively. There are no facilities for physical education but the school makes very good use of local parks and sports centres. The school does not have suitable facilities for those who are ill. The school is currently looking for more suitable premises. Provision of information The school provides all parents, carers and others with clear, accurate and up-to-date information. All of the required information is provided, or made available, through the school prospectus and website. Well-written and regular reports are provided for parents and carers about their children’s progress. Parents and carers have frequent opportunities to meet staff to discuss their children’s progress. A parent trainer is available to assist parents and carers who may require additional support. The response to the pre-inspection questionnaire was positive. Parents, carers and a placing authority confirmed that pupils had settled in well, one commenting, ‘The programmes of support are tailored to suit young people’s individual needs… this school has already made a difference.’ Manner in which complaints are to be handled The school has a set of written procedures which meet regulatory requirements. Compliance with regulatory requirements The proprietor has ensured that the school meets The Education (Independent School Standards) (England) Regulations 2010, schedule 1 (‘the Regulations’), with the exception of those listed below.3 The school does not meet all requirements in respect of the premises of and accommodation at schools (standards in part 5) and must: 3 www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2010/1997/contents/made. ensure that there are appropriate facilities for pupils who are ill, in accordance with regulation 5 of the Education (School Premises) Regulations 1999 (paragraph (23k)). What the school could do to improve further While not required by regulations, the school might wish to consider the following points for development. Continue the search for more suitable premises to enable the pupils to enjoy good quality learning experiences in a more suitable environment.