Gilbert Scott Primary School


Name Gilbert Scott Primary School
Website http://www.gilbertscott.croydon.sch.uk/
Ofsted Inspection Rating Requires improvement
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Address Farnborough Avenue, South Croydon, CR2 8HD
Phone Number 02086574722
Type Academy
Age Range 3-11
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 208 (51.4% boys 48.6% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 14.3
Academy Sponsor The Collegiate Trust
Local Authority Croydon
Percentage Free School Meals 39.6%
Percentage English is Not First Language 28.4%
Persisitent Absence 16.5%
Pupils with SEN Support 14.7%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (12 September 2017)
There may have been more recent inspections such as monitoring visits or short inspections. For details of all inspections, please view this provider on our map here.
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.

Information about this school

The school meets requirements on the publication of specified information on its website. This school is smaller than the average-sized primary school. The proportion of pupils who are known to be eligible for free school meals is well above the national average. The proportion of pupils who are from minority ethnic groups and who speak English as an additional language is well above the national average. The proportion of pupils who have special educational needs and/or disabilities who receive support is above average, while the proportion of pupils who have a statement of special educational needs or an education, health and care plan is well above average. The school meets the government’s current floor standards in 2016. These set the minimum expectations for pupils’ progress and attainment in reading, writing and mathematics at the end of key stage 2. The local authority has supported the school by brokering the services of an executive headteacher from a local primary school, Courtwood Primary School. The current executive headteacher took up her position in September 2016. This arrangement was initially for one year, but has now been extended to the current academic year. The school has three specialist resource units, Willow Tree Nursery and two enhanced learning provisions. The Nursery provides a total of 12 places, six in the morning session and six in the afternoon session, for children who have severe and complex needs. The two enhanced learning provisions provide for the needs of pupils who have moderate learning difficulties. This is a full-day provision which has a maximum of 14 places for pupils from Reception to Year 6.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a school that requires improvement The quality of teaching is inconsistent across year groups and in a wide range of subjects. As a result, pupils’ progress, particularly that of disadvantaged pupils and the most able pupils, is variable and not as strong as it should be. Leaders have very recently introduced a new curriculum. Although pupils learn a wide range of subjects, including science and geography, the work is not sufficiently challenging. Consequently, pupils do not develop a deep enough understanding in these subjects. Governors do not sufficiently hold leaders to account for the use of additional funding to improve outcomes for key groups of pupils. Class teachers do not consistently use assessment information to design learning activities to match pupils’ needs. As a result, pupils do not make the progress of which they are capable. There are limited opportunities for pupils to use their literacy and numeracy skills across the curriculum. Pupils do not securely apply their writing skills in a range of subjects. Leaders have used a range of strategies to improve attendance. However, attendance remains stubbornly below the national average, particularly for pupils eligible for free school meals. The school has the following strengths Leaders have created a strong, caring and nurturing learning environment. Pupils feel safe and happy at school. Pupils in the special educational needs resource base make good progress in their learning. This is because their needs are well met. In the early years, good-quality teaching has resulted in children making good progress. Children leave the key stage well prepared for their learning in Year 1. Pupils are true advocates of the school. They are committed to and know well the school’s aims and values. Pupils are well behaved, polite and respectful.