Havering College of Further and Higher Education


Name Havering College of Further and Higher Education
Website http://www.havering-college.ac.uk/
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 07 February 2011
Address Ardleigh Green Road, Hornchurch, Essex, RM11 2LL
Phone Number 01708455011
Type General Further Education and Tertiary
Age Range unknown
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Number of Pupils unknown

Information about the provider

1. Havering College of Further and Higher Education is a large college, situated in the outer London Borough of Havering, on the borders of east London, Essex and Kent and within the London Thames Gateway. It has three main sites at Ardleigh Green, Quarles and Rainham, together with various community venues. Engineering provision is also offered at the nearby Thames Gateway College, a partnership with Barking and Dagenham College and the Ford Motor Company. 2. The college offers provision from pre-entry, including courses for learners with learning difficulties and/or disabilities and learners aged 14 to 16, and extending to a large higher education programme. It operates in all 15 subject sector areas of further education. In addition to its learner responsive provision, it has large work-based learning and Train to Gain contracts. The proportion of learners from ethnic minority communities attending the college is significantly higher than in the local population, at around 25%. 3. The London Borough of Havering has a population of approximately 230,000, with 23% over the age of 60, compared to the London average of 16%. Just over half of the population are women and around 90% are of White ethnic groupings. Havering is generally considered to be an area of comparative affluence, with low unemployment. However, there are pockets of deprivation within the borough which rank highly on the scale of key indicators of social deprivation and many learners are drawn from surrounding boroughs which are amongst the most economically and socially deprived in the country. 4. The mission of the college is to provide high quality education and training and its vision is of a college provided by the community for the benefit of its communities. 5. The following organisations provide training on behalf of the college: M2 Training Limited (Train to Gain, for National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) road passenger transport operations and NVQ aviation operations in the air) Muradi LLP (Train to Gain, for NVQ vehicle body repair) Results Consortium Limited (Train to Gain, for NVQ business improvement techniques) Waste Management Assessment Service Limited (Train to Gain, for NVQ waste management operations and NVQ cleansing and support services) Writtle College (Adult learner responsive and apprenticeship provision in horticulture). Type of provision Number of enrolled learners in 2009/10 Provision for young learners: 14 to 16 Further education (16 to18) Foundation learning, including 165 part-time learners 2,782 full-time learners 567 part-time learners 445 full-time learners 110 part-time learners Provision for adult learners: Further education (19+) 707 full-time learners 4,105 part-time learners Employer provision: Train to Gain Apprenticeships 1,518 learners 365 apprentices Summary report Grades: 1 is outstanding; 2 is good; 3 is satisfactory; 4 is inadequate Overall effectiveness of provision Grade 2 Capacity to improve Grade 2 Grade Outcomes for learners 3 Quality of provision 2 Leadership and management 2 Safeguarding Equality and diversity 2 2 Subject Areas Grade Engineering and manufacturing technologies 3 Construction 2 Arts, media and publishing 2 Provision for learners with learning difficulties and/or disabilities 1 Business, administration and law 3 Overall effectiveness 6. This is a good college, with many strong aspects to its work. The college, with its large and complex offer, is well led and managed. Learners are at the centre of its work and ambitions and they have good opportunities to express their views, which are listened to. The college’s capacity to make further improvements is good. Quality improvement arrangements, including the college’s self-assessment of its own strengths and weaknesses, are good, although they have not yet brought about sufficient improvements in advanced level course outcomes. Previous issues with the accuracy of data are now fully resolved. 7. Learners achieve satisfactory outcomes overall and enjoy their learning. Overall college outcomes for young and adult learners on further education courses are satisfactory and improving. They are often good for learners on entry, foundation and intermediate level courses, but poorer for those on advanced level courses. Outcomes for learners following Train to Gain courses are very good and satisfactory overall for apprenticeship learners. Learners’ skills and standards of work are good and learners often make good progress on their courses. Many continue with their studies to higher levels, often at the college. Learners feel very safe in the college and the college’s arrangements for safeguarding learners are good. 8. Teaching and learning are good. Well-qualified and experienced teachers, often plan and teach lessons well and learners gain good knowledge. In less successful lessons, teachers provide too few opportunities for learners to be involved and to participate actively. The needs of users and the local community are met outstandingly well through a wide and expanding range of courses. The college’s extensive partnerships with other organisations are outstanding in helping to improve the quality of learners’ courses. The care, guidance and support of learners are good. The promotion of equality and diversity is good. Main findings Learners’ attainment of qualifications is satisfactory. Overall college learner responsive success rates, over the last three years, have improved to national average levels for general further education colleges. Overall long course success rates have also improved over the last two years and are now just above the national average, but with poorer performance at advanced level. Employer responsive course outcomes are very good for Train to Gain, both for completion and for completion within expected timescales. Overall, they are just below national averages for apprentices, but with some high success rates. Learners’ skills and standards of work are good. They often make good progress. Learners enjoy their studies, are well motivated and develop the confidence to progress to further learning. Their attendance is good. Progression to further studies, including at the college, is good. Learners feel very safe in the college and value the sensitive attention to security at the college’s sites. Arrangements to manage safeguarding issues are good. Teaching and learning are good. Inspectors confirmed the college’s own observation and judgements of teaching and learning outcomes. In the best lessons, enthusiastic, and sometimes inspirational, teaching is supported by good use of information learning technologies (ILT) to provide stimulating and memorable lessons. Most learners take an active part in group work, ask questions and share their own experiences. The needs and interests of users are met outstandingly well. A broad, inclusive curriculum has good progression routes. Very successful projects develop employability including excellent provision for adults with learning difficulties and/or disabilities. An exceptionally wide range of flexible, customised programmes are highly responsive to employers’ needs. Learners’ enrichment activities are good. Partnership working is outstanding, with particularly strong links into local workforce development and regional planning. Good educational and subject related networking broadens opportunities for learners. Community partnerships are strong. Pastoral support for learners is excellent and improves their chances of success. They receive fast and effective help for personal and financial problems. Extensive investment in staff training has developed outstanding specialist support for learners with disabilities. Learners receive good advice and guidance. Improved guidance, including initial assessment, better helps them choose the right course and ensures appropriate support to succeed, although the monitoring and review of improvements is insufficiently developed. Tutorials and individual meetings monitor progress effectively following extensive staff training. However, target setting for learners’ progress, whilst improved, is insufficiently thorough. Leadership and management are good. Senior managers and governors promote clear values and objectives within a supportive and inclusive culture. Curriculum management is generally strong, although some inconsistencies remain in approaches to the implementation of improvement strategies. The promotion of equality and diversity is good. Learners feel that the college is a safe environment where everyone is treated with respect. The college is very effective in enabling learners, employers and other stakeholders to make their views known. The college provides good value for money. Financial management is strong, staff are well qualified and accommodation and resources are of a high standard.

Main findings

Learners’ attainment of qualifications is satisfactory. Overall college learner responsive success rates, over the last three years, have improved to national average levels for general further education colleges. Overall long course success rates have also improved over the last two years and are now just above the national average, but with poorer performance at advanced level. Employer responsive course outcomes are very good for Train to Gain, both for completion and for completion within expected timescales. Overall, they are just below national averages for apprentices, but with some high success rates. Learners’ skills and standards of work are good. They often make good progress. Learners enjoy their studies, are well motivated and develop the confidence to progress to further learning. Their attendance is good. Progression to further studies, including at the college, is good. Learners feel very safe in the college and value the sensitive attention to security at the college’s sites. Arrangements to manage safeguarding issues are good. Teaching and learning are good. Inspectors confirmed the college’s own observation and judgements of teaching and learning outcomes. In the best lessons, enthusiastic, and sometimes inspirational, teaching is supported by good use of information learning technologies (ILT) to provide stimulating and memorable lessons. Most learners take an active part in group work, ask questions and share their own experiences. The needs and interests of users are met outstandingly well. A broad, inclusive curriculum has good progression routes. Very successful projects develop employability including excellent provision for adults with learning difficulties and/or disabilities. An exceptionally wide range of flexible, customised programmes are highly responsive to employers’ needs. Learners’ enrichment activities are good. Partnership working is outstanding, with particularly strong links into local workforce development and regional planning. Good educational and subject related networking broadens opportunities for learners. Community partnerships are strong. Pastoral support for learners is excellent and improves their chances of success. They receive fast and effective help for personal and financial problems. Extensive investment in staff training has developed outstanding specialist support for learners with disabilities. Learners receive good advice and guidance. Improved guidance, including initial assessment, better helps them choose the right course and ensures appropriate support to succeed, although the monitoring and review of improvements is insufficiently developed. Tutorials and individual meetings monitor progress effectively following extensive staff training. However, target setting for learners’ progress, whilst improved, is insufficiently thorough. Leadership and management are good. Senior managers and governors promote clear values and objectives within a supportive and inclusive culture. Curriculum management is generally strong, although some inconsistencies remain in approaches to the implementation of improvement strategies. The promotion of equality and diversity is good. Learners feel that the college is a safe environment where everyone is treated with respect. The college is very effective in enabling learners, employers and other stakeholders to make their views known. The college provides good value for money. Financial management is strong, staff are well qualified and accommodation and resources are of a high standard.