Kensington Avenue Primary School

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Kensington Avenue Primary School


Name Kensington Avenue Primary School
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Address Kensington Avenue, Thornton Heath, CR7 8BT
Phone Number 02087642923
Type Academy
Age Range 4-11
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 589 (49.2% boys 50.8% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 23.6
Academy Sponsor The Manor Trust
Local Authority Croydon
Percentage Free School Meals 23.9%
Percentage English is Not First Language 46.5%
Persisitent Absence 10.4%
Pupils with SEN Support 7.4%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (23 May 2017)
There may have been more recent inspections such as monitoring visits or short inspections. For details of all inspections, please view this provider on our map here.
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.

Information about this school

Kensington Avenue Primary is larger than the average-sized primary school. There have been many changes in staffing since the previous inspection. There is a Nursery and three Reception classes in the early years provision. Pupils come to the school from a wide range of cultural backgrounds. The proportion of pupils who speak English as an additional language is high, with many different home languages being spoken by the pupils. The proportion of disadvantaged pupils is above average. The proportion of pupils who have special educational needs and/or disabilities is above average. The school has an enhanced learning provision (ELP) for 15 pupils who have the autistic spectrum disorder. The school meets the government’s current floor standards, which set the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress in reading, writing and mathematics at the end of Year 6. The school meets requirements on the publication of specified information on its website. The school shares a site with a children’s centre that is managed by the school’s governing body. The children’s centre is subject to separate inspections.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school The headteacher, governors and other leaders are united in driving the school forward. They are having a positive impact on teaching and pupils’ outcomes. Leadership and management at all levels are effective in identifying next steps and securing improvement. Leaders have established a school where pupils are keen to succeed. Teaching, learning and assessment are good. Teachers make effective use of information on how well pupils are doing to provide motivating work for pupils of differing abilities. Personal development, behaviour and welfare are good. Pupils are polite and friendly and keen to learn. They feel safe at school and know how to stay safe. Pupils’ outcomes are good. Pupils of differing abilities make good progress from their starting points and are prepared well for the next stage of their education. Children make good progress in the early years provision. They become confident learners and are enthusiastic about trying out a wide range of activities. Pupils in the enhanced learning provision (ELP) make good progress. They benefit from clear questioning and the positive use of praise. Teachers do not always make sure that the most able pupils are moved on in their learning so that they can work at greater depth. Some opportunities are missed to encourage the pupils, especially the boys, to practise and extend their writing skills when learning in other subjects. Leaders do not ensure that a few hard-to-reach families send their children to school regularly.