Kirkham and Wesham Primary School

About Kirkham and Wesham Primary School Browse Features

Kirkham and Wesham Primary School


Name Kirkham and Wesham Primary School
Website http://www.kirkhamwesham.lancs.sch.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 23 October 2013
Address Nelson Street, Kirkham, Preston, Lancashire, PR4 2JP
Phone Number 01772682866
Type Primary
Age Range 4-11
Religious Character Does not apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 204 (46% boys 54% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 24.2
Local Authority Lancashire
Percentage Free School Meals 14.6%
Percentage English is Not First Language 10.3%
Persisitent Absence 1.7%
Pupils with SEN Support 14.2%
Catchment Area Information Available Yes, our catchment area data is FREE
Last Distance Offered Information Available No

Information about this school

Kirkham and Wesham Primary School is slightly smaller than most primary schools. The proportion of pupils known to be eligible for the pupil premium is similar to the national level. (The pupil premium is additional funding provided for those pupils who are known to be eligible for free school meals, children from services families and those children that are looked after.) The proportion of pupils from minority ethnic groups who attend the school is below average. The proportion of pupils who speak English as an additional language is below average. However, the number of pupils at the early stages of learning English is rapidly increasing. The proportion of pupils supported through school action is similar to national levels, as is the proportion of pupils supported at school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs. There is an increasing proportion of pupils joining the school at times other than the expected. The school meets the government’s current floor standards, which are the minimum expected for pupils’ attainment and progress.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. From starting points below those typically expected when starting school, pupils now make good progress. By the end of Year 2 and Year 6, standards attained in reading, writing and mathematics are improving. Teaching is usually good and there are examples of outstanding teaching. During the inspection, pupils’ behaviour in and around the school was good and school records show that this is typical. Pupils have a positive attitude toward learning; they enjoy school and value the staff and each other. Pupils feel safe in school because they know that they are well cared for. Attendance is above average. The curriculum meets the needs of pupils well and there is an effective programme for promoting pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development. Consequently, pupils are considerate and respectful towards adults and each other. The headteacher is ambitious for the school and is successfully driving forward school improvement. She is well supported by her senior leadership team, staff and a highly committed, well-informed governing body. Together they are maintaining the quality of teaching and working to improve pupils’ progress still further. It is not yet an outstanding school because : There is not enough outstanding teaching in the school. Pupils do not always have enough time to explain and discuss their ideas together so that they can work things out for themselves. There are too few opportunities for pupils to check their own work and the work of their classmates. Targets set for pupils’ progress in teachers’ appraisal objectives are not always high enough. Leaders do not make full use of the school’s assessment system to check the progress of different groups of pupils across the school.