St Helen’s Catholic Primary School

About St Helen’s Catholic Primary School Browse Features

St Helen’s Catholic Primary School


Name St Helen’s Catholic Primary School
Website http://www.federationcc.org.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Address West Street, Hoyland, Barnsley, S74 9DL
Phone Number 01226742172
Type Primary
Age Range 5-11
Religious Character Roman Catholic
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 146 (53.4% boys 46.6% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 19.1
Local Authority Barnsley
Percentage Free School Meals 22.6%
Percentage English is Not First Language 1.4%
Persistent Absence 11.2%
Pupils with SEN Support 11.2%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (09 January 2018)
There may have been more recent inspections such as monitoring visits or short inspections. For details of all inspections, please view this provider on our map here.

Information about this school

This school is smaller than the average-sized primary school. The majority of pupils are White British. The proportion of pupils who are from minority ethnic groups or who speak English as an additional language is below average. A lower than average proportion of pupils is disadvantaged. The proportion of pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities is below average. The proportion of pupils who have an education, health and care plan is above average. Children start at the school in Reception on a full-time basis. The year groups are arranged into five mixed-age classes. The school is federated with two other primary schools, St Michael’s Catholic Primary School and Sacred Heart Catholic Primary School, also situated in Barnsley. The three schools share an executive headteacher and have their own head of school in post.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school Most pupils make good progress during their time in school. This is the case in all areas of the curriculum. Most groups of learners achieve well and standards have improved since the last inspection, including those of disadvantaged learners and pupils who have special educational needs (SEN) and/or disabilities. However, some of the most able pupils do not always make rapid enough progress in English. Teaching meets the needs of pupils well, especially in mathematics. Teachers assess pupils’ learning well and use this assessment to plan work that is engaging and challenging for most pupils. However, teaching does not always challenge the most able pupils in reading and writing enough. Pupils’ conduct is good and they engage well in their learning. This contributes to their good progress. They behave well at all times of the day because they enjoy school and value and understand the rules. Most parents have a very positive view of the school. A very small minority of parents feel that their concerns are not always heard by leaders. Leaders acknowledge that they need to find different strategies to engage with all parents and carers. Leaders have had a positive impact on the school since the last inspection. They hold staff to account well and provide many good training opportunities. On the whole, this has improved teaching and pupils’ outcomes. However, the teaching of phonics is not strong. Leaders have not effectively tackled this or provided training to improve the quality of teaching in this area. There are some missed opportunities, however, to reinforce phonics in key stage 1. The curriculum is broad and balanced. Pupils reinforce their reading, writing and mathematical skills well across a range of subjects. Pupils are given regular opportunities and experiences which enhance their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development. Such experiences also support pupils’ understanding of British values and prepare them well for life in modern Britain. Children in early years get off to a good start. They are well engaged and make good progress. The curriculum suits their needs well. At times, the most able children need to be challenged more. Pupils do not attend well enough.