St Luke’s Halsall Church of England Primary School

About St Luke’s Halsall Church of England Primary School Browse Features

St Luke’s Halsall Church of England Primary School


Name St Luke’s Halsall Church of England Primary School
Website http://www.stlukeshalsall.co.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 05 March 2019
Address Cooks Road, Crosby, Liverpool, Merseyside, L23 2TB
Phone Number 01519245142
Type Primary
Age Range 3-11
Religious Character Church of England
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 230 (54% boys 46% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 24.6
Local Authority Sefton
Percentage Free School Meals 3.2%
Percentage English is Not First Language 3.9%
Persisitent Absence 5.1%
Pupils with SEN Support 8.7%
Catchment Area Information Available Yes, our catchment area data is FREE
Last Distance Offered Information Available No

Information about this school

St Luke’s Halsall is an average-sized primary school. The majority of pupils are White British. The proportion of disadvantaged pupils is lower than other schools nationally. The proportions of pupils who have an education, health and care plan and who receive support for SEND are below average.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school Although there have been considerable changes in leadership and staffing since the last inspection, the quality of teaching and outcomes for pupils remain good overall. In key stages 1 and 2, current pupils make good progress in reading, writing and mathematics. Progress across other curriculum subjects is good. Disadvantaged pupils and those with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND) make good progress. However, leaders do not make regular checks on the quality of the delivery of the interventions they receive. The roles of subject leaders are developing effectively. However, those new to post do not have regular opportunities to monitor the quality of pupils’ work. The curriculum is broad, balanced and engaging. Provision for pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development has been planned well. Pupils are prepared for life in modern Britain. Governors understand the strengths and weaknesses of the school. They hold leaders to account well. Pupils are polite and courteous. Incidents of poor behaviour are uncommon. Pupils show kindness and empathy to their peers. The teaching of phonics is good. Pupils are becoming competent readers. The quality of teaching overall is good. However, teachers do not regularly challenge the most able pupils to reach the higher standards in English and mathematics. Expectations for the quality of pupils’ handwriting and presentation is variable between year groups. Pupils do not have enough regular opportunities to develop their writing. There is a strong culture of safeguarding in the school. Leaders put the safety and well-being of the pupils at the heart of their work. Parents and carers hold the school in high regard. They are supportive of school leaders and appreciate the care that teachers and staff afford their children. The early years requires improvement. Leaders have not ensured that the children in the Reception and Nursery class benefit from the same quality of teaching and learning.