St Margaret’s at Troy Town CofE Voluntary Controlled Primary School

About St Margaret’s at Troy Town CofE Voluntary Controlled Primary School Browse Features

St Margaret’s at Troy Town CofE Voluntary Controlled Primary School


Name St Margaret’s at Troy Town CofE Voluntary Controlled Primary School
Website http://www.stmargaretsattroytown.co.uk
Inspections
Ofsted Inspections
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Address King Street, Rochester, ME1 1YF
Phone Number 01634843843
Type Academy
Age Range 3-11
Religious Character Church of England
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 227 (52.9% boys 47.1% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 23.7
Academy Sponsor The Pilgrim Multi Academy Trust
Local Authority Medway
Percentage Free School Meals 26%
Percentage English is Not First Language 18.5%
Persistent Absence 8.2%
Pupils with SEN Support 9.7%%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Inspection

This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Information about this school

The school is slightly smaller than the average-sized primary school. The large majority of pupils are of White British heritage. The next largest groups are from Bangladeshi or Indian backgrounds, some of whom speak English as an additional language.

The proportion of disabled pupils and those who have special educational needs supported at school action is below average. The proportion supported by school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs is above average. Pupils' needs are mainly related to speech, language and communication difficulties.

The proportion of pupils for whom the school receives additional funding (the pupil premium) because they are known to be eligible for free school meals, are in the care of the local authority, or are from other groups, is below average. The school meets the current government floor standards, which set the minimum expectations for pupils' attainment and progress in English and mathematics. The school makes provision for the Early Years Foundation Stage in an integrated Foundation Stage Unit for children in the Nursery and Reception Year.

The school provides a daily breakfast club, which is managed by the governing body. A Children's Centre is located on the same site and is subject to separate inspection arrangements.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school.

Pupils achieve well from below average starting points and by the time they leave at the end of Year 6, attainment in English and mathematics is at least in line with that found nationally. Standards have been steadily rising over the past three years. In the 2013 as yet unvalidated national assessments, attainment rose to above the average seen in the previous year, in reading, writing and mathematics.

Pupils make good progress in all years because teaching is good and sometimes outstanding. Teaching engages and enthuses pupils who have good attitudes to learning and want to do well. Pupils behave well in lessons and around the school.

They feel safe and are well cared for. They enjoy coming to school, as shown in their above average attendance. The headteacher, deputy headteacher, senior leaders and governors have successfully improved the school from its position at the previous inspection.

The governing body effectively supports the school and holds it to account for its performance. Senior leaders rigorously monitor the quality of teaching and learning so they can identify strengths and weaknesses and provide appropriate support to ensure improvement. It is not yet an outstanding school because : There is not enough outstanding teaching to ensure the best possible progress for all pupils.

Not as many more able pupils reach the high levels of which they are capable in reading as in writing. Teachers' marking and feedback does not always show pupils how to improve their work. Not all subject leaders ensure that teaching in their subjects results in the very best learning.