St Mary & All Saints Church of England Primary School

About St Mary & All Saints Church of England Primary School Browse Features

St Mary & All Saints Church of England Primary School


Name St Mary & All Saints Church of England Primary School
Website http://www.stmaryandallsaints.co.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Inadequate
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Address Wensley Road, Coley Park, Reading, RG1 6DU
Phone Number 01189015545
Type Academy
Age Range 3-11
Religious Character Church of England
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 329 (54.1% boys 45.9% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 17.6
Academy Sponsor The White Horse Federation
Local Authority Reading
Percentage Free School Meals 27.2%
Percentage English is Not First Language 34.4%
Persistent Absence 11.6%
Pupils with SEN Support 10%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (17 October 2017)
There may have been more recent inspections such as monitoring visits or short inspections. For details of all inspections, please view this provider on our map here.
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.

Information about this school

St Mary and All Saints is a larger-than-average-sized primary school with a Nursery. Children attend the Nursery part-time. The interim headteacher joined the school in September 2015. About three quarters of pupils come from minority ethnic backgrounds. Approximately one third of pupils speak English as an additional language. Both these figures are above average. A third of pupils are eligible for the pupil premium, which provides additional funding for children in local authority care or known to be eligible for free school meals. This is above the national average. The proportion of pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities being supported is below the national average. The proportion of pupils supported with an education, health and care plan, including those with a statement of special educational needs, is below the national average. In 2016, the school met the government’s floor standard, which sets the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress in English and mathematics. The school does not meet requirements on the publication of information because the school’s pupil premium strategy for the current academic year, the most recent key stage 2 results and the school’s special educational needs information report are not available on its website.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is an inadequate school Since the previous inspection, improvement has been too slow. Temporary and ever-shifting leadership and staffing arrangements mean that there is no compelling momentum for change. Standards remain low. Responsible stakeholders including the diocese, local authority, executive committee and governing body have had insufficient impact. Consequently, the school has floundered and school effectiveness continues to wane. Leaders’ actions to improve the school have not had the desired impact. Since the last inspection, standards have continued to slide, particularly in key stage 1. Some parents are dissatisfied with the school’s effectiveness. Too few pupils in key stages 1 and 2, including those from vulnerable groups, achieve the standards expected for their age in reading, writing and mathematics. Approximately 50% of staff are temporary and few stay long enough to make a real difference to pupils’ learning. The quality of teaching and learning over time is inadequate. Pupils’ attendance is declining. Absence for some vulnerable groups is gradually increasing and is above that seen nationally. The curriculum does not meet pupils’ needs. Pupils do not study a range of subjects with any regularity. Pupils are uninspired and lack motivation to give of their best in learning activities. Standards are too low, particularly in science. The school has the following strengths Last year’s Year 6 pupils benefited from high-quality teaching and learning experiences. By the time pupils left the school, they had caught up in reading, writing and mathematics. Pupils achieve well in some subjects, including physical education and music. The quality of teaching, learning and leadership within the early years is a strength in the school. Safeguarding is effective. Parents are rightly confident that their children are safe in school.