The John Fisher School


Name The John Fisher School
Website http://www.johnfisherschool.org/
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Address Peaks Hill, Purley, CR8 3YP
Phone Number 02086604555
Type Secondary
Age Range 11-18
Religious Character Roman Catholic
Gender Boys
Number of Pupils 1126 (100% boys)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 16.4
Local Authority Sutton
Percentage Free School Meals 7.1%
Percentage English is Not First Language 17.3%
Persisitent Absence 11.1%
Pupils with SEN Support 14.5%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (24 October 2013)
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Information about this school

The John Fisher School is an average-sized Roman Catholic boys’ comprehensive school in the diocese of Southwark. It has a sports specialism. The proportion of students from minority ethnic backgrounds is above average. The proportion of students who speak English as an additional language is below average. The proportion of students for whom the school receives the pupil premium (additional government funding for students known to be eligible for free school meals, looked-after children and service family children) is below average. There is one looked-after child and no children from service families. A small number of students are eligible for Year 7 catch-up funding, which is for pupils who did not attain the expected levels in reading and mathematics at the end of primary school. The proportion of disabled students and those with special educational needs supported through school action is below average. The proportion supported through school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs is above average. The school meets the government’s floor standards, which set the minimum expectations for students’ attainment and progress. The school does not use any alternative educational provision. A few sixth form students attend some lessons at a neighbouring Roman Catholic girls’ school in a reciprocal arrangement between the schools.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. Students make good progress and achieve well. As a result, the standards achieved by students in English and mathematics and in most subjects are above the national average. The school is improving quickly. Teaching is good and some is outstanding. Lessons are well planned and teachers use resources effectively. The pace of lessons is good. Behaviour is outstanding. Students feel safe in school and any rare instances of bullying are dealt with effectively. There is an ethos of care and consideration for others. Very good relationships exist between staff and students. The school promotes students’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development very well. The sixth form is outstanding. Students achieve exceptionally well as a result of excellent teaching and are prepared well for higher education courses which meet their interests and aspirations. The sport specialism makes a valuable contribution to the life of the school. Students’ achievement and personal development are supported through extra-curricular activities and many opportunities for leadership through sport. Senior leaders and governors have a clear vision and sense of moral purpose for the school and its students. They work very effectively with parents and the whole school community to develop ‘very well-rounded young men, ready for life’. It is not yet an outstanding school because : The gap between the achievement of students supported by the pupil premium and their peers widened in the 2013 GCSE results. A minority of lessons require improvement because the needs of all students are not met when teachers’ questioning and feedback are not strong. There is not enough outstanding teaching in the main school. Students, particularly the most able, do not have enough planned opportunities to investigate and research for themselves so that they make the progress of which they are capable.