West Walsall E-ACT Academy


Name West Walsall E-ACT Academy
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Address Primley Avenue, Walsall, WS2 9UA
Phone Number 01922720741
Type Academy
Age Range 11-18
Religious Character None
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 1110 (50.5% boys 49.5% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 14.2
Academy Sponsor E-Act
Local Authority Walsall
Percentage Free School Meals 44.8%
Percentage English is Not First Language 66.9%
Persistent Absence 21.8%
Pupils with SEN Support 8.9%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (31 October 2017)
There may have been more recent inspections such as monitoring visits or short inspections. For details of all inspections, please view this provider on our map here.

Information about this school

The school meets requirements on the publication of specified information on its website. The school complies with Department for Education guidance on what academies should publish. West Walsall E-ACT Academy opened in September 2012. E-ACT is the sponsor. The board of trustees is the appropriate authority. A local ambassadorial advisory group is in place but has no accountability responsibilities. The headteacher has been in post since April 2016. The school is smaller than the average-sized secondary school. When the school was inspected in March 2016, it was judged to require special measures. Subsequently, the school had two monitoring inspections. At the previous monitoring inspections, leaders and managers were judged to be taking effective action towards the removal of special measures. Pupils enter the school with starting points significantly below the national average. The proportion of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals is above average. The proportion of pupils from minority ethnic groups is above average. The proportion of pupils who speak English as an additional language is above average. A large proportion of these pupils are competent or fluent in English. The proportion of pupils who receive special educational needs support is below average. The proportion of pupils with an education, health and care plan is below average. No pupils have a statement of special educational needs. The school is likely to meet the provisional government floor standard. Pupils are placed in four ?small schools?, Tolkien, Shakespeare, Austen, Bronte, for tutor periods and for pastoral support. . The school does not use alternative educational provision.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school The headteacher, staff and the trust have successfully addressed the school?s previous weaknesses. Improvements since March 2016 have been significant. This is a rapidly improving school. Leaders have created a culture in which pupils flourish socially and academically. Staff understand and share leaders? vision to ?provide an education that enables pupils to grow and develop into well-educated young citizens?. Staff and the trust make sure that all pupils are well cared for and safe. The school?s safeguarding arrangements are highly effective. Teaching throughout the school is improving rapidly and is particularly effective in English, religious education and art. However, inconsistencies remain in a small number of mathematics, history, geography and science classes. A small minority of leaders do not challenge underperformance quickly enough. The curriculum is planned well and provides a broad range of experiences. This is starting to have a positive effect on pupils? outcomes and their readiness for the next stage of their education or employment and training. Pupils? behaviour and attendance are good. The large majority of pupils are polite and thoughtful, and take their learning seriously. However, a few staff do not manage pupils? misbehaviour consistently. As a result, a few pupils talking out of turn disrupt other pupils? learning in a small number of classes. The recently relaunched sixth form provides a well-planned, well-organised, good level of education and support. As a result, students? academic and social needs are catered for well. Leaders have worked effectively to improve pupils? writing skills that are now good. However, pupils? reading skills are less well developed and a significant minority of pupils do not read widely or often. The school?s work to promote pupils? personal development and welfare is good. Pupils are safe and happy in school. The pupils understand how fundamental British values underpin modern Britain. Pupils? achievements throughout the school are rapidly improving. However, the legacy of previous poor teaching means that pupils? progress, particularly that of a few pupils who have special educational needs and/or disabilities and the most able pupils in mathematics, lags behind improvements in the quality of teaching.