Woodcote High School


Name Woodcote High School
Website http://www.woodcotehigh.com
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Address Meadow Rise, Coulsdon, CR5 2EH
Phone Number 02086686464
Type Academy
Age Range 11-19
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 1232 (51.9% boys 48.1% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 16.0
Academy Sponsor Woodcote High School
Local Authority Croydon
Percentage Free School Meals 16.1%
Percentage English is Not First Language 10.5%
Persisitent Absence 12.7%
Pupils with SEN Support 13.3%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (21 January 2015)
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Information about this school

The academy is larger than the average-sized secondary school. The sixth form is smaller than average. About two thirds of the students attending the academy are White British, along with an above average percentage of students from many different minority ethnic backgrounds. A lower-than-average proportion of students speak English as an additional language, of whom only a few are at an early stage of learning English. The proportion of students who receive support through the pupil premium is below average. This is additional government funding for specific groups, including students known to be eligible for free school meals and looked after children. A few looked after children attend the academy. The proportion of disabled students and those who have special educational needs is above average. The most common needs relate to students with autism, physical disability or moderate learning difficulties. Since the previous inspection, an Enhanced Learning Provision facility has been set up for students with physical disabilities. It is funded by the local authority and run by the academy. Ten of the 14 places available have been filled so far. About 30 students are eligible for Year 7 catch-up funding, which is for students who did not achieve the expected Level 4 in reading or mathematics at the end of Key Stage 2. A very small number of sixth form students study one of their subjects at Riddlesdown Collegiate. The academy does not use any other off-site education provision. The school is a member of the Valley Teaching School Alliance which includes two other secondary and several primary schools. The school exceeds the government’s current floor standard, which sets the minimum expectations for students’ attainment and progress.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. GCSE results were well above average in 2014. Over twice the national percentage of students achieved the English Baccalaureate qualification. Sixth form results also improved in 2014. They were close to average, particularly at AS level. The most able students are attaining higher standards than in recent years. Most students make very good progress, particularly in English and mathematics. Students with disabilities and others with special educational needs achieve very well. Students behave well. They enjoy lessons and work hard. They feel safe and secure. Teaching has improved since the previous inspection. Teachers prepare students very well for examinations. At all levels, leadership and management are well organised, determined and effective. The quality of academic and pastoral care for disabled students and others with special educational needs is outstanding. The headteacher and senior leaders have made significant improvements in the quality of teaching and students’ achievement in the last two years. They know exactly where further work is needed. Governors carry out their duties diligently. They were fully involved in the recent improvements and regularly attend meetings on current developments. Now in its fifth year, the sixth form is good and becoming a popular choice for Year 11 students. The academy’s work to foster students’ tolerance, for example of different faiths and lifestyles, is a strength of their personal development. Students mature into thoughtful, considerate young adults and, as a result, many proceed to university. It is not yet an outstanding school because : The academy has not yet eliminated the achievement gap between disadvantaged students and others. The percentage of top GCSE, AS and A-level grades is not high enough in several subjects. The quality and regularity of marking is inconsistent and, in some cases, is holding back rapid progress. The quality of teaching is not as strong in Years 7 to 9 as it is in Years 10 to 13.