Abbey CofE Infant School


Name Abbey CofE Infant School
Website http://www.abbeyinfants.co.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Outstanding
Inspection Date 16 January 2014
Address Aston Road, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, CV11 5EL
Phone Number 02476386101
Type Primary
Age Range 3-7
Religious Character Church of England
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 216 (54% boys 46% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 24.2
Percentage Free School Meals 19.7%
Percentage English is Not First Language 20.5%

Information about this school

This is an average-sized school. Nursery sessions take place each morning and afternoon, and the arrangements for children’s attendance are flexible. There are two single-age classes in the Reception Year and in Years 1 and 2. Pupils are grouped by ability for literacy lessons. The proportions of pupils from minority ethnic groups and pupils who speak English as an additional language are broadly average. A few are at the early stages of learning English. The proportion of disabled pupils and those who have special educational needs supported through school action is well above average. The proportion supported at school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs is about average. The proportion of pupils supported by extra funding through the pupil premium is above average. In this school it applies to children who are in the care of the local authority and those known to be eligible for free school meals. Since the previous inspection there have been many changes of teaching staff, including the appointment of a new headteacher in 2011 and a new deputy headteacher. There is a privately run nursery, Abbey Fields Day Nursery, on the school site. It is inspected separately. The school is in the process of taking over the responsibility for running this nursery. The school receives no external support. The school provides support to other local schools through: the headteacher leading Early Years’ networking meetings two teachers in Key Stage 1 acting as assessment moderators for the local authority other teachers visiting to observe the work of the learning mentor and nurture group, the school’s effective implementation of a commercial literacy scheme, and the way children are taught in the Early Years Foundation Stage.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is an outstanding school. Since the headteacher joined this school, there has been rapid improvement in all areas of its work. Children in the Nursery and Reception classes achieve exceptionally well in all areas of learning. They develop the ability to learn rapidly by themselves and use their curiosity to investigate a wide range of stimulating activities. In Years 1 and 2, the achievement of all groups of pupils continues to be outstanding. By the end of Year 2, standards in reading, writing and mathematics are above average. Pupils benefit from consistently high quality teaching across different subjects in all year groups. Much teaching is inspirational and fires pupils’ interest. Teachers are very good role models, which encourages pupils to do their very best and behave outstandingly well. This makes an exceptional contribution to learning because : pupils concentrate fully over long periods of time. All aspects of pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development are promoted very well. This is highly effective in helping pupils to develop strong relationships and outstanding attitudes to learning. The school’s work to keep pupils safe and secure is outstanding. Pupils feel very safe in school. Teamwork among staff is exceptionally strong. Senior leaders work alongside other staff to set a high-quality example. The progress of all groups of pupils is carefully checked, but it is not helpfully recorded for some pupils who get extra support. Staff are set rigorous targets to improve their work. This has resulted in a rapid improvement in the quality of teaching and hence learning over the last three years. Senior leaders are highly effective in checking how well the school is doing and planning to improve teaching and learning. Governors also play a critical role in this work.