Abbey Park Middle School


Name Abbey Park Middle School
Website http://www.abbeyparkmiddle.worcs.sch.uk/
Ofsted Inspection Rating Requires improvement
Inspection Date 23 October 2018
Address Abbey Road, Pershore, Worcestershire, WR10 1DF
Phone Number 01386552667
Type Primary
Age Range 9-12
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 204 (54% boys 46% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 10.6
Local Authority Worcestershire
Percentage Free School Meals 15.2%
Percentage English is Not First Language 4.9%

Information about this school

Abbey Park Middle School is smaller than the average-sized school. The school is part of a federation, which also consists of a pre-school and a first school. There is one governing body that is responsible for all three schools in the federation. Abbey Park Middle School caters for pupils in Years 5, 6 and 7. There are three classes in each year group. A new executive headteacher and head of school took up post in September 2018. The proportion of disadvantaged pupils is in line with the national average. The proportion pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities is above the national average. The number of pupils with education, health and care plans is above the national average. Almost all pupils are from a White British background. There is a resource base at the school that caters for up to 10 pupils with an education, health and care plan for autism. The school runs a breakfast club and an after-school club.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a school that requires improvement For the past three years, pupils’ attainment and progress in mathematics at the end of Year 6 has been well below national averages. Less than half of pupils have entered Year 7 well prepared for the next stage in their education. The school’s assessment system does not provide clear and accurate information about pupils’ progress. As a result, leaders and governors have not identified and addressed important areas of underperformance until very recently. Middle leaders do not have an accurate understanding of the quality of teaching in their areas of responsibility. Some teachers do not have high enough expectations of what pupils can achieve. They do not have a secure knowledge of the standards pupils should be working at for their age. Teachers do not plan learning that matches pupils’ abilities closely enough. As a result, middle- and high-attaining pupils do not make the progress of which they are capable. Too often, work in lessons does not take account of pupils’ starting points. Teachers do not use questioning to deepen pupils’ learning. The curriculum is broad but does not enable pupils to achieve well enough across a wide range of subjects. Leaders and governors do not make sure that additional funding is making a positive difference to pupils’ outcomes, including those of disadvantaged pupils. Absence has been above national averages for the past three years. The proportion of pupils who are persistently absent from school is well above national averages. The school has the following strengths The recently appointed executive headteacher and head of school have quickly and accurately identified the school’s strengths and weaknesses. They have already begun to make improvements. Systems are now in place to hold staff to account for the quality of teaching and pupils’ progress. Pupils’ behaviour, welfare and personal development is strong and reflects the school’s ethos and values. The school provides well for pupils who have special educational needs (SEN) and/or disabilities. It is highly regarded in the local community for this aspect of its work.