Abbots Green Primary Academy

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About Abbots Green Primary Academy


Name Abbots Green Primary Academy
Website http://www.abbotsgreenacademy.co.uk
Inspections
Ofsted Inspections
Address Airfield Road, Bury St Edmunds, IP32 7PJ
Phone Number 01284718818
Type Academy
Age Range 2-11
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 489 (53.9% boys 46.1% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 23.2
Academy Sponsor Unity Schools Partnership
Local Authority Suffolk
Percentage Free School Meals 11.6%
Percentage English is Not First Language 7.7%
Persistent Absence 5.5%
Pupils with SEN Support 3.6%
Highlights from Latest Inspection

What is it like to attend this school?

The 'rainbow values' encapsulate all that is great about the pupils at Abbots Green Primary Academy. Pupils are responsible in how they approach learning, reading regularly to win the sought-after 'reading cup'.

They are aspirational in how they take on roles, training hard to do these well.

Pupils feel inspired to behave well by the 'zone board' and its system of rewards. Many pupils strive to achieve gold to access special privileges.

The nurturing 'Rainbow Room' is a hive of activity that helps build pupils' self-esteem. Pupils learn about bullying, which helps them bravely report it when it occurs. Pupils know staff will work quickly to investigate and re...solve issues.

Due to the well-considered curriculum, pupils are open-minded. They speak kindly and maturely about how people and families may be different. They relish opportunities to try new things, be it through school trips or the varied before- and after-school club offer.

The last school value is 'wow' and, for certain aspects of the school, it is a fitting word to use. There is no doubt that pupils feel happy and safe at this school.

What does the school do well and what does it need to do better?

Children in the early years get off to an impressive start.

Leaders are rightfully proud of how they and their staff developed the provision. A considered curriculum helps children learn interesting concepts and vocabulary. Staff's astute assessment informs activities that help children develop skills.

For example, many children in Reception write well due to how staff in the school's Evergreen Nursery develop children's small- and large-muscle skills. Children present as confident, curious individuals. Staff build children's understanding of feelings over time, helping children regulate their behaviour.

Staff share helpful guidance with parents. It helps parents support their child's learning and wider development. Children are well prepared for Year 1.

The school's detailed curriculum supports teachers to educate pupils well. When needed, leaders take sensible action to strengthen the curriculum. For example, for those pupils learning to read, staff audited the books carefully to check that they contain the sounds pupils know.

This helps them to read with increasing fluency to access more challenging texts.

Leaders consider assessment practices carefully. Most teachers make astute assessments in lessons to address any pupil's misunderstanding.

There is space in the timetable for teachers to review taught content with pupils. Nonetheless, some pupils find it difficult to recall learning from previous years. This makes it difficult for those pupils to maximise their knowledge by making links to what they learned before.

Staff oversee suitable support for pupils with special educational needs and/or disabilities. Teachers explore how they can aid learning and behaviour before seeking further support. Where needed, leaders help teachers access further support for a pupil.

Staff involve parents and pupils in this to maintain strong relationships.

Pupils' behaviour is confident and kind. Staff model the behaviours they expect to see.

The high expectations for behaviour also exist for attendance. Staff manage attendance with rigour, ensuring it remains appropriately high.

It is the add-ons in the school's personal development programme that set it apart.

For example, staff diligently train pupils ahead of them taking on responsibilities. As a result, the pupils take their roles seriously and effect change well. This includes training others new to the role.

The extra-curricular offering acts as a springboard for pupils to further their talents. For example, staff facilitated pupils from the school choir joining the cathedral choir. They now have greater performance opportunities.

The 'Rainbow Room' is at the heart of the school's pastoral support. Passionate staff provide nurture for pupils and parents. This facility extends well beyond the school day.

Dedicated leaders help drive improvements in the school. They share their clear evaluation with governors. Governors use this to inform their visits.

They check that the curriculum and other systems work well. Staff and parents praise the school, including the work of leaders. This is a school where staff feel valued and parents feel happy to send their children.

Safeguarding

The arrangements for safeguarding are effective.

The trust cascades training to school level well. Staff receive regular guidance from school leaders to help them identify vulnerable pupils.

Concerns are shared swiftly. Training ensures written records are factual and suitably detailed. Leaders follow up on concerns without delay.

Confident, knowledgeable staff complete appropriate checks on those adults working or volunteering in school.

Pupils speak knowingly about how to stay safe on and offline. The dedicated pupils who form the 'safety squad' secure changes to procedure and the premises to ensure everyone is kept safe.

What does the school need to do to improve?

(Information for the school and appropriate authority)

• Leaders have structured the curriculum to facilitate pupils revisiting content learned in their year group. However, some pupils struggle to recall what they learned in previous years to strengthen their understanding. Leaders must review their systems to ensure teachers support pupils to make links between current and previous learning to help them remember more over time.