Brookfield Primary Academy

Brookfield Primary Academy


Name Brookfield Primary Academy
Inspections
Ofsted Inspections
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Address Lime Grove, Mexborough, S64 8TQ
Phone Number 01709570727
Type Academy
Age Range 3-11
Religious Character None
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 252 (50.8% boys 49.2% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 23.3
Academy Sponsor Aston Community Education Trust
Local Authority Rotherham
Percentage Free School Meals 39.1%
Percentage English is Not First Language 4.8%
Persistent Absence 14.7%
Pupils with SEN Support 8.3%
Highlights from Latest Inspection
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is an inadequate school Leaders have not acted quickly enough to bring about the rapid improvements needed to provide an acceptable standard of education.

A lack of clarity around accountability, governance and leadership has resulted in key aspects of school improvement remaining unchecked, which has contributed to the slow pace of change. Leaders have failed to secure high-quality permanent members of teaching staff. As a result, the quality of teaching, learning and assessment is inconsistent.

Leaders cannot identify how well different groups of pupils are progressing throughout the year because they do not analyse progress information. Consequently, d...isadvantaged pupils have significantly underachieved. Safeguarding procedures are inadequate because the relevant recruitment information is not being checked.

Adults do not keep pupils safe from peer-on-peer aggression. Inadequate outcomes at the end of key stage 2 demonstrate the lack of progress made by all pupils. Teachers' expectations are not high enough, and as a result the most able pupils are not sufficiently challenged.

Assessment information is insecure. Leaders do not check progress in pupils' workbooks accurately. Consequently, in key stage 2 there is an over-positive picture of the rate of pupils' progress.

Teacher's assessments of the starting points of children as they enter Nursery and Reception are too low. As a result, assessment of progress across the early years is unreliable. Subject leadership is underdeveloped.

Pupils receive a limited curriculum which does not prepare them for life in modern Britain. Too many lessons are being disrupted by poor behaviour, which is impeding the progress of all pupils within the class. Levels of attendance are too low.

The school has the following strengths There has been an improvement in the proportion of pupils reaching the required standard in early reading skills in key stage 1. The use of the sport premium has resulted in increased uptake of after-school sports clubs.

Information about this school

The school does not comply with DfE guidance on what academies should publish about admission arrangements, examination and assessment results, the school curriculum, information on pupil premium funding, information on physical education (PE) and sports funding, how parents request paper copies of information available on the website, or governor information.

Since becoming an academy in January 2014, there has been significant turbulence at the school. The initial academy sponsor left in May 2015. Wakefield City Academies Trust (WCAT) were then asked by the regional schools commissioner to take over the school.

WCAT put in a temporary headteacher from May 2015 until November 2015, when the position was made permanent. WCAT officially took over the school from August 2015. A significant number of teachers and support staff left the school in July 2015 and some throughout 2016, adding to high levels of staff absence.

Leaders are still struggling to recruit a full complement of high-quality teachers and secure middle leadership positions. This has had a significant impact on the school's capacity to improve. The school is around the average size for a primary school and serves an area of high deprivation.

The proportion of pupils known to be eligible for pupil premium funding is above that seen in most schools. The majority of pupils are from a White British background. The proportion of pupils with identified special educational needs is below that seen nationally.