Coppice Performing Arts School

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Coppice Performing Arts School


Name Coppice Performing Arts School
Website https://www.coppiceschool.net/
Inspections
Ofsted Inspections
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Address Ecclestone Road, Wolverhampton, WV11 2QE
Phone Number 01902558500
Type Academy
Age Range 11-18
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 1033 (45.3% boys 54.7% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 16.1
Academy Sponsor Central Learning Partnership Trust
Local Authority Wolverhampton
Percentage Free School Meals 25.2%
Percentage English is Not First Language 1.9%
Persistent Absence 15%
Pupils with SEN Support 17.3%%
Highlights from Latest Inspection
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a school that requires improvement Teaching and achievement are not consistently good, particularly for the most able pupils and those who have special educational needs or disability. Sometimes teachers do not set work that is at the right level for pupils. Some pupils lose concentration and do not produce enough work.

Teachers do not ask enough questions that require pupils to think hard. The sixth form requires improvement because : students do not achieve as well in academic courses as they do in vocational subjects. Too few achieve the highest grades in academic courses.

Students who re-take GCSE mathematics in the sixth form do not achieve well e...nough. Leaders do not check the impact of teaching on the progress of different groups of pupils in sufficient detail. The strategies to improve the progress of disadvantaged pupils are not checked robustly.

Leaders have not ensured that teachers apply the school's marking policy consistently. The governing body does not hold school leaders to account well enough for closing the gaps that exist between the progress of different groups of pupils. The school has the following strengths This is an improving school.

Teaching, achievement and leadership are all improving. The headteacher is creating a culture where staff and pupils are developing high expectations of themselves. Pupils conduct themselves well.

They are polite and considerate. Disadvantaged pupils in key stage 4 are catching up with others in the school. The performing arts subjects are strong.

Sixth form students make good progress in vocational courses. Students' personal development is good in the sixth form. Safeguarding is effective.

Pupils feel safe and have a strong understanding of safety matters. The curriculum is good. It helps pupils to develop a good awareness of spiritual, moral, social and cultural issues.

Pupils understand and apply the principles of British values.

Information about this school

The school is an average-sized secondary school. Ninety per cent of pupils are from White British backgrounds.

Very few pupils speak English as an additional language. The proportion of pupils who have special educational needs or disability is below average. The pupil premium, which is additional government funding given to schools for children who are looked after by the local authority and those known to be eligible for free school meals, provides support for just over one in four.

This is similar to the national average. The school meets the government's current floor standards, which set the minimum expectations for pupils' attainment and progress by the end of Year 11. A small number of pupils attend alternative provision on a full-time basis.

These pupils attend the Orchard Centre, the Midpoint Centre, Walsall College and the Braybrook Centre. The school is supported by two national leaders in education from The Streetly Academy and South Bromsgrove High School. This support began in September 2015.

The school meets requirements on the publication of specified information on its website. The school moved to new buildings in 2013. There are a number of on-going financial issues, which partly relate to the costs of the new buildings, which are placing significant demands on the school budget.