Courtwood Primary School


Name Courtwood Primary School
Website http://www.courtwood.croydon.sch.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Address Courtwood Lane, Addington, Croydon, CR0 9HX
Phone Number 02086578454
Type Academy
Age Range 4-11
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 215 (53% boys 47% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 16.6
Academy Sponsor The Collegiate Trust
Local Authority Croydon
Percentage Free School Meals 23.7%
Percentage English is Not First Language 11.9%
Persisitent Absence 5.1%
Pupils with SEN Support 8.7%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (04 February 2014)
There may have been more recent inspections such as monitoring visits or short inspections. For details of all inspections, please view this provider on our map here.
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.

Information about this school

The school is smaller than average. A new headteacher and deputy headteacher have been appointed since the previous inspection. The majority of pupils are White British, but around a third are from minority ethnic backgrounds, which is an above average proportion. A slightly lower-than-average proportion of pupils are at an early stage of learning to speak English. The proportion of pupils eligible for additional funding from the pupil premium (those known to be eligible for free school meals, in the care of the local authority, or with a parent or carer in the armed services) is lower than normally found. The proportion of disabled pupils and those with special educational needs supported through school action is below average, but the proportion supported at school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs is above average. The school meets the government’s floor standards which set the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress in English and mathematics. Building work is in progress to extend the school accommodation to house a special resource provision for pupils with special educational needs. The school is part of the Selsdon Education Partnership (SEP).

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. The new headteacher provides clear and effective direction which has resulted in the quality of pupils’ learning improving since the previous inspection. Governors give good support. The quality of teaching is now typically good through the school and enables pupils to achieve well and enjoy their learning. Results in national tests have risen since the previous inspection. Pupils have good basic skills, particularly in their speaking, listening and reading skills. Pupils’ attainment in writing and mathematics is also starting to rise. They are effectively prepared for their next schools. Pupils relate positively to each other and to visitors. They behave well within lessons and at lunchtimes. They say they feel very safe, as the school provides outstanding levels of safety. They like activities in their new woodland area, and take their roles of responsibility very seriously. Parents and carers, with very few reservations, are very positive about the school’s effectiveness. Children have a secure and happy start to their education in the Reception class. Pupils with special educational needs, who speak English as an additional language, or are entitled to pupil premium funding, achieve well. It is not yet an outstanding school because: Occasionally, there are not enough opportunities for pupils in Years 3 to 6 to apply their mathematical skills in everyday, real-life activities. Not all pupils are fully confident to write at length or for different purposes. The high quality of teaching in some classes is not used as a model for other staff to help boost the quality of teaching still further. Pupils are not always able to make use of information and communication technology (ICT) in day-to-day activities to improve their learning. In a few lessons, activities do not stretch the thinking of some pupils enough. Occasionally some children in the Early Years Foundation Stage spend too long on activities before moving on to others, so their pace of learning drops.