Earl’s Court Free School Primary

About Earl’s Court Free School Primary Browse Features

Earl’s Court Free School Primary


Name Earl’s Court Free School Primary
Website http://www.wlfs-earlscourt.org
Ofsted Inspection Rating Outstanding
Address Cambridge Grove, London, W6 0LB
Phone Number 02087419967
Type Academy
Age Range 4-11
Religious Character None
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 180 (53.3% boys 46.7% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 21.5
Academy Sponsor Knowledge Schools Trust
Local Authority Hammersmith and Fulham
Percentage Free School Meals 10%
Percentage English is Not First Language 50%
Persisitent Absence 7.9%
Pupils with SEN Support 4.7%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (14 June 2017)
There may have been more recent inspections such as monitoring visits or short inspections. For details of all inspections, please view this provider on our map here.

Information about this school

The school meets requirements on the publication of specified information on its website. The school complies with Department for Education guidance on what academies should publish. Earl’s Court Free School Primary is a small primary school. It opened in September 2014 with an intake of 30 Reception children who attend on a full-time basis. In September 2015 and September 2016, the school admitted a further 30 children each year. The school will continue to grow to the full primary age range, catering for pupils aged between four and 11. The school is part of the West London Free School Academy Trust, which includes two other primary schools and a secondary school. The trustees oversee the work of all four schools. The school shares the same site as West London Free Primary School. The school is due to move into a new building in 2020. The proportion of pupils eligible for free school meals is below the national average. The proportion of pupils who speak English as an additional language is above the national average. The number of pupils who have special educational needs and/or disabilities is below the national average.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is an outstanding school The executive headteacher, supported by a highly skilled leadership team, has quickly established a culture of academic excellence. The values of curiosity, fortitude, excellence, serenity and purpose underpin the school ethos. The strengths of staff and pupils are nurtured, as are links with parents. Consequently, there is a feeling of shared success. Alongside trustees and governors, leaders have focused on ensuring that teaching is of the highest quality. As a result, a talented team of staff secure outstanding outcomes for pupils. The interesting curriculum is ambitious and stimulating. Pupils have exciting opportunities to build on their knowledge. This contributes to a strong promotion of pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural education. Pupils make rapid progress from their starting points. This is also the case for those pupils from a disadvantaged background because of excellent use of the pupil premium funding. Pupils who have special educational needs and/or disabilities make very strong progress because of the clear identification of need and successful support. Behaviour is exemplary in class and as pupils move around the school. Pupils in Reception, Year 1 and Year 2 have a very mature attitude to learning. They demonstrate the school’s values admirably in their lessons. Provision in the early years is outstanding because it is expertly led. Children have a strong start to their education due to the high level of challenge that staff give them. As a result, they make excellent progress. The arrangements for safeguarding pupils’ welfare are rigorously applied. Clear procedures are well understood by all staff. Parents work closely with the school in sharing the drive for high standards. They appreciate how their views are listened to and help form school policy. Accurate assessments of reading, writing and mathematics are compared regularly with national information. The progress of different groups of pupils is tracked effectively. Leaders have rightly identified that boys require additional challenge to ensure that a greater proportion exceed national age expectations in writing.