Elm Grove Primary School, Worthing

About Elm Grove Primary School, Worthing Browse Features

Elm Grove Primary School, Worthing


Name Elm Grove Primary School, Worthing
Website http://www.elmgrove.org.uk/
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Address Elm Grove, Worthing, BN11 5LQ
Phone Number 01903249387
Type Primary
Age Range 4-11
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 216 (44% boys 56% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 21.6
Local Authority West Sussex
Percentage Free School Meals 13.9%
Percentage English is Not First Language 10.1%
Persistent Absence 7.6%
Pupils with SEN Support 13.7%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (19 June 2018)
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Information about this school

Until 2015, Elm Grove was a first school and pupils joined the school in Reception and left at the end of Year 3. Following the local authority?s restructuring of education, the school became an all-through primary. The school now has pupils in all year groups from Reception to Year 6. There is one class in Reception and in each of Years 1, 2 and 6. There are two classes in each of Years 3, 4 and 5. The current Year 6 class of 14 pupils is the first cohort to reach the end of key stage 2. The headteacher has been in post since September 2015 following the retirement of the previous headteacher. The proportion of pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities is well above the national average. The proportion of disadvantaged pupils is below the national average. However, there are wide variations in the number of disadvantaged pupils in different year groups. There is a breakfast club which is run by school staff. A private nursery, which has separate Ofsted registration and is inspected separately, is located on the school site. The private nursery also runs an additional breakfast club and an after-school club at the school. The school receives support from the local authority?s school improvement partner. The school has also brokered external support from the local teaching school alliance.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school The school is well led by the headteacher. She has successfully reversed the school?s declining standards. As a result, teaching and outcomes for pupils have improved, and are now good. Leaders have managed the school?s transition from a first to a primary school effectively. Governance is strong. Governors provide effective challenge and support to the school. Leaders have ensured that the curriculum is broad and interesting and enables pupils to achieve well in a range of subjects, particularly in religious education, science and history. Provision for pupils? personal development and welfare is outstanding, including in the early years. There is a strong culture to keep children safe. Pupils behave well and have positive attitudes to learning. They enjoy coming to school because it is a happy place to be. Partnerships with parents are strong. Parents are overwhelming in their support for and praise of the school. Pupils achieve very well in phonics and reading. The most able pupils attain particularly well in reading. Newly appointed phase leaders are beginning to impact positively on pupils? outcomes. The local authority has provided good support and guidance to the school during a period of change and transition. A higher-than-average proportion of children in the early years achieve the expected ?good level of development?. The school?s improvement and pupil premium plans are not precise enough. Sometimes teachers plan activities which lack clarity or challenge, particularly for the most able pupils. Disadvantaged pupils do not attain as well as their peers, and few attain the higher standards. Too few of the most able pupils in key stages 1 and 2 attain the higher standards in writing and mathematics. Pupils? punctuation and handwriting are not developed well enough. Children in the early years do not have enough opportunities to write independently, and few exceed the expected standards in writing. The curriculum does not include enough opportunities for children to learn about geography.