Finham Park 2


Name Finham Park 2
Website http://www.finhampark2.co.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 05 June 2018
Address Torrington Avenue, Coventry, West Midlands, CV4 9WT
Phone Number 02477710720
Type Academy
Age Range 11-19
Religious Character None
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils Unknown
Academy Sponsor Finham Park Multi-Academy Trust
Local Authority Coventry
Percentage Free School Meals 16.8%
Pupils with SEN Support 22.7%
Catchment Area Information Available Yes, our catchment area data is FREE
Last Distance Offered Information Available No

Information about this school

Finham Park 2 opened as a free school in September 2015. It currently has pupils in key stage 3 and key stage 4 in Year 9. The headteacher was in post before the school opened. The school is heavily oversubscribed. The school is smaller than the average-sized secondary school because as a recently opened school there are still only three year groups. Two further year groups will be added over the next two years. The proportion of disadvantaged pupils is above the national average. The proportion of pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities is slightly above the national average. A small number of pupils have a statement of special educational needs or an education, health and care plan. No pupils attend alternative provision off site. The school has not been assessed against the government’s current floor standards, which set the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress by the end of Year 11, as there are currently no pupils in Years 10 or 11.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school The headteacher is supported and challenged well by governors. Together, they have created a new school with a clear, aspirational ethos that expects all pupils to excel and offers them many opportunities to explore what talents and skills they possess. The collaboration within Finham Park Multi-Academy Trust (FPMAT) is effective. Leaders at all levels receive strong support and challenge through this partnership. Leaders have high expectations for themselves and pupils and know their school well. They are highly reflective and respond quickly when changes are required. The curriculum is very broad, and pupils benefit from an extensive ‘out of school hours learning’ (OOSHL) programme. Leaders promote British values and pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development very well, fostering tolerance and respect amongst pupils. The extent to which pupils feel safe is very high. Incidents of bullying are very rare according to staff, parents and pupils spoken to. Staff and pupils say that they are proud to be members of the school. Leaders have developed ambitious systems for setting pupils targets. They use moderation across the trust to ensure that how they track pupils’ progress is accurate. The large majority of pupils in Years 7 to 9 are making good progress across most subjects as a result of good teaching. This includes pupils who are disadvantaged. Much of the teaching ensures that pupils from different starting points are able to learn effectively. However, not all pupils are consistently challenged, including through the use of teachers’ questions. Although teaching is good, it is stronger in some subjects than others. It is not so strong in mathematics, for example. Some teaching does not meet the full range of needs of all pupils, especially the most able. There are pockets of low-level disruptive behaviour in some classes where teachers do not apply the behaviour policy consistently. Leaders do not ensure that all teachers follow policies for written feedback, presentation and behaviour consistently.