Four Acres Academy


Name Four Acres Academy
Website http://www.fouracresacademy.co.uk/
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 27 February 2012
Address Four Acres, Withywood, Bristol, BS13 8RB
Phone Number 01179030474
Type Academy
Age Range 2-11
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 407 (54% boys 46% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 22.0
Academy Sponsor Little Acorn Trust
Local Authority Bristol City of
Percentage Free School Meals 31.2%
Percentage English is Not First Language 7.9%

Information about the school

The school is an average-sized primary school. Most pupils are from White British backgrounds, the proportion of pupils who speak English as an additional language is well below the national average. The proportion of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals is above the national average. The percentage of disabled pupils and those who have special educational needs is average; the proportion with a statement of special educational needs is below average. Pupils in most year groups are organised in single-age classes, but some pupils from Years 1 and 4 are in mixed-age classes. The school has achieved national Healthy Schools Status and the Bike It silver award. The governing body manages a breakfast club in the school. The school meets the government’s current floor standards, which set the minimum expectations for students’ attainment and progress. Four Acres Children’s Centre is located on the same site and is managed by the governing body. It was subject to a separate inspection at the same time as the school.

Key findings

This is a good school where the strong, caring ethos and good-quality safeguarding enables pupils to feel safe and know that adults are there to help them. Attainment in English and mathematics is below average, but pupils are making good progress and, as a result, the gap to the national averages is steadily closing, particularly in reading. It is not an outstanding school because, although the leadership of teaching and the management of performance are good, subject leaders have not yet had enough opportunity to strengthen pupils’ achievement across the whole curriculum and particularly English and mathematics. Consistent teaching of sounds that letters and groups of letters make (phonics) enables pupils to develop successful strategies for reading and writing. Standards in writing have been improving steadily over a period of time. Well-planned support for disabled pupils and those who have special educational needs and for pupils who speak English as an additional language enables these pupils to make good and, sometimes, outstanding progress. Teaching throughout the school is mainly good, with some outstanding practice. Pupils receive feedback about their work which is often very clear about what they have done well and how they can improve, but this is not consistent across the school and there is not always time for pupils to respond to these comments or to make judgements about their own work. Pupils behave well in lessons and around school. They work and play well together and those who may find this difficult are supported well through consistent routines to make the right choices about their behaviour. As a result, there is no disruption to learning. Leaders and managers, including the governing body, have a clear focus on the right priorities to improve the school further. Teachers are given strong support to develop their skills, particularly in using and understanding the information regarding pupils’ achievement.