Fringford Church of England Primary School


Name Fringford Church of England Primary School
Website http://www.fringford.oxon.sch.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 27 September 2012
Address The Green, Fringford, Bicester, Oxfordshire, OX27 8DY
Phone Number 01869277397
Type Primary
Age Range 4-11
Religious Character Church of England
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 93 (51% boys 49% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 19.0
Local Authority Oxfordshire
Percentage Free School Meals 3.2%
Percentage English is Not First Language 3.2%

Information about this school

Fringford Church of England Primary School is much smaller than the average-size primary school. There is a low proportion of pupils who are supported through school action, school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs. The proportion of pupils known to be eligible for the pupil premium is below average. The school meets the government’s current floor standard, which sets the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress. The on-site, privately run pre-school did not form part of this inspection.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. Pupils make good progress across the school, leading to above-average attainment in reading, writing and mathematics by Year 6. Good teaching supports all groups of pupils well. Teachers make learning meaningful through the effective use of a range of interesting tasks and resources. There is effective one-to-one support for pupils who find learning difficult. Pupils are polite and friendly, behave well, feel safe at school and are keen to learn. Leaders, including the governors, work well as a team. They know the school’s strengths and understand what needs to be done next to make the school even better. Leaders have a positive impact on maintaining good teaching and pupils’ good achievement. Most of the parents and carers who contributed their views to the inspection are very pleased with the school. It is not yet an outstanding school because : Progress in mental mathematics is not always as fast as it could be. In a few lessons in mental mathematics, activities are not sufficiently adapted to support and challenge all pupils. Some opportunities are missed for pupils to demonstrate and extend their writing and numeracy skills when working in other subjects. Pupils are not consistently expected to act on advice given through teachers’ marking.