Gatcombe Park Primary School


Name Gatcombe Park Primary School
Website http://www.gatcombeparkprisch.co.uk/
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Address St Barbara Way, Hilsea, Portsmouth, PO2 0UR
Phone Number 02392694412
Type Academy
Age Range 4-11
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 207 (52.7% boys 47.3% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 25.4
Academy Sponsor Hamwic Education Trust
Local Authority Portsmouth
Percentage Free School Meals 18.8%
Percentage English is Not First Language 15.5%
Persistent Absence 7.6%
Pupils with SEN Support 5.3%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (24 November 2011)
There may have been more recent inspections such as monitoring visits or short inspections. For details of all inspections, please view this provider on our map here.
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.

Information about the school

Pupils in this average-sized primary school come from a predominantly White British background. The largest minority ethnic group is of pupils from Black African heritage. The proportion of pupils with special educational needs and/or disabilities is currently below average. The main group consists of pupils with speech, language and communication difficulties. Currently, the number of pupils with a statement of special educational needs is below average. The proportion of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals is below average. The Early Years Foundation Stage provision is provided through the Reception class. The school has gained the Healthy Schools award. A breakfast and an after-school club, managed by the governing body, are situated on the school site and both were visited by inspectors.

Main findings

The school provides a good standard of education for its pupils, including those children in the Early Years Foundation Stage. The school has outstanding features. The very high commitment level of the headteacher and deputy is shared by all adults and this is reflected in the very positive outcomes for pupils. Very successful work by the school has resulted in the pupils having a high attendance record. All pupils benefit from some excellent and effective partnerships. For example, the pupils? knowledge of healthy eating and modern technology has been very well developed through links with local businesses. Attainment is above average. Pupils, by the end of Year 6, in 2011 attained above average levels. This constitutes good progress for the large majority of pupils and includes those known to be eligible for free school meals. Boys attained less well than girls in writing but were still above the national average. The good curriculum is being very well developed. It is being built around projects which are being chosen to motivate boys and give them more opportunities to write. Teaching is good. There is an increasing number of outstanding lessons in which pupils, including those from a Black African heritage, progress extremely well because teachers plan challenging work for pupils of different abilities. There remains some inconsistency in teaching. For example, when marking, not all teachers make clear to pupils the next steps in their learning. Marking, on occasions, also fails to make clear to pupils the level of their work in subjects other than English and mathematics. Computers are used in lessons; for example, an outstanding lesson was observed with pupils using laptops to work on texts, and interactive white boards are used by teachers. However, the school has identified that not all teachers use their ICT subject knowledge well enough to maximise the learning opportunities for pupils as a part of everyday classroom practice. On occasions, opportunities are also missed during lessons to assess pupils? level of understanding, and to identify to pupils how they can further improve their work in ICT. The experienced headteacher has successfully used a strategy involving a wide number of stakeholders, including the governing body, to identify strengths and areas for development. The effective development plan for the school is clearly centred on improving outcomes for pupils, in terms of both their personal and academic development. Leadership and management responsibilities have been well distributed and self-evaluation is embedded in the school. Current priorities include improving mathematics through introducing more investigative approaches. Such accurate self-assessment, together with the good progress the pupils make, their above average attainment and the school?s outstanding features, reflects a good capacity to sustain improvement.