Highbury Primary School


Name Highbury Primary School
Website http://www.highburyprimary.org
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Address Dovercourt Road, Cosham, Portsmouth, PO6 2RZ
Phone Number 02392375404
Type Academy
Age Range 4-11
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 407 (47.9% boys 52.1% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 19.5
Academy Sponsor University Of Chichester (Multi) Academy Trust
Local Authority Portsmouth
Percentage Free School Meals 28%
Percentage English is Not First Language 7.4%
Persistent Absence 7.8%
Pupils with SEN Support 22.7%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (24 October 2012)
There may have been more recent inspections such as monitoring visits or short inspections. For details of all inspections, please view this provider on our map here.
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.

Information about this school

This is a larger than average-sized primary school with nine classes. There are four classes for children in the Early Years Foundation Stage, there are two Reception/Year 1 classes, one class for three- and four-year-olds and one class for two- and three-year-olds. Pupils in Years 1 to 6 are taught in mixed-age classes. There are two classes for Year 1 and 2 pupils, three classes for Year 3 and 4 pupils and two classes for Year 5 and 6 pupils. There is a breakfast club and an after-school club, both of which are managed by the governing body. A higher-than-average proportion of pupils join and leave the school other than at the usual times. The large majority of pupils are of White British heritage, the proportion of pupils from minority ethnic backgrounds is below average. The proportion of pupils who speak English as an additional language or are at the early stages of speaking English when they join the school is below average. The proportion of disabled pupils and those who have special educational needs and those who need extra help is above average. The proportion of pupils known to be eligible for the pupil premium funding, which in this school provides additional government funding for pupils known to be eligible for free school meals, is above the national average. The school meets the government?s current floor standards, which set out the minimum expectations of pupils? attainment and progress. Following the last inspection, the headteacher left the school in January 2011. An interim headteacher was in post from January to July 2011. The current headteacher took up her post in September 2011. There have been a number of staff changes since the previous inspection and the class structure has been reorganised.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. Pupils make good progress in reading writing and mathematics. They achieve well. Attainment at the end of Year 2 is rising. Attainment at the end of Year 6 is in line with the national average. Pupils behave well, feel safe and have good attitudes to learning. They enjoy coming to school, which is reflected in the improved rates of attendance. Pupils with additional needs, and those whose circumstances make them vulnerable, make similar progress to other pupils. The subjects taught are interesting and exciting, providing a range of opportunities for pupils to develop their literacy and numeracy skills. All outstanding issues raised at the last inspection have been addressed. Leaders, managers and the governing body have a clear vision for the school which has been shared and understood by staff and parents. Self-evaluation has correctly identified the most important areas for improvement through rigorous monitoring procedures. Setting targets for teachers has been used well to improve the quality of teaching. Weak teaching has been eradicated. Training and development activities for teachers, teaching assistants and other support staff have increased their skills, contributing to the improvements in teaching and learning and the behaviour of pupils. The school provides good support for the small number of pupils who find it a challenge to behave well. It is not yet an outstanding school because : A small proprotion of teaching still requires improvement and not enough teaching is outstanding. Pupils need more opportunities to develop the ability to work by themselves. Pupils? speaking and listening skills require further development. Pupils are not always involved enough in monitoring their own progress.