Kingsley St John’s CofE (VA) Primary School

About Kingsley St John’s CofE (VA) Primary School Browse Features

Kingsley St John’s CofE (VA) Primary School


Name Kingsley St John’s CofE (VA) Primary School
Website http://www.kingsley-st-johns.cheshire.sch.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 27 November 2018
Address Hollow Lane, Kingsley, Frodsham, Cheshire, WA6 8EF
Phone Number 01244976181
Type Primary
Age Range 3-11
Religious Character Church of England
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 78 (62% boys 38% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 15.1
Local Authority Cheshire West and Chester
Percentage Free School Meals 5.3%
Percentage English is Not First Language 0%
Persisitent Absence 8.2%
Pupils with SEN Support 21.8%
Catchment Area Information Available Yes, our catchment area data is FREE
Last Distance Offered Information Available No

Information about this school

This is a much smaller than average-sized primary school. The number of pupils in each year group ranges from five to 13. All pupils are taught in mixed-age classes. Since the previous inspection the school has begun to admit Nursery-age children. The number of pupils in school has almost doubled since the previous inspection. The proportion of pupils with SEND is well above the national average, as is the proportion of pupils who have an education, health and care plan. The proportion of pupils who join the school during the school year and within key stages 1 and 2 is well above average. The school is a voluntary aided Church of England primary school. As it is a school with a religious character it is also inspected under Section 48 of the Education Act 2005. The school’s last such inspection was in May 2014.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school Leaders’ admirable drive and determination have ensured that Kingsley St John’s continues to provide its pupils with a good standard of education. Leaders, including governors, have created a school whose nurturing, Christian ethos shines through all of its work. Pupils learn to treat each other with kindness and to accept and value their individual differences. Behaviour in the school is good. Pupils get on well together on the playground, move around school sensibly and show good manners. They have positive attitudes to learning. Attendance is good and few pupils regularly miss school. Pupils say that they feel safe and happy in school. Parents and carers who completed Ofsted’s Parent View survey overwhelmingly agreed. Teaching across the school is effective. This is particularly the case in mathematics and reading, where teachers plan well to meet pupils’ learning needs and use questions skilfully to check what pupils have learned. Pupils successfully learn to use their knowledge of phonics to help them read unfamiliar words. However, teachers are not as adept at linking phonics and spelling, and so pupils are prone to making mistakes spelling relatively simple, phonetically-plausible words. The school’s curriculum is rich and well thought out. Pupils enjoy the many practical activities that they are given, including science experiments and using source materials in history. The curriculum is further enhanced through educational visits. Children in early years settle in quickly and get off to a good start because they are well taught and looked after. Pupils with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND) are very well supported. They make good progress from their individual starting points. Small cohort sizes mean that there are great fluctuations in published data. Overall, progress and attainment in mathematics and reading are good, as are outcomes across the wider curriculum. Leaders have secured improvements in pupils’ written work, but there is more to be done. Teachers do not consistently insist that work is free from the basic errors that detract from the overall quality of pupils’ writing. The most able pupils in particular have limited opportunities to write at length and for different purposes. While leaders and staff undoubtedly want the best for pupils, staff do not have a clear picture of how good the very best work needs to be.