Our Lady of the Angels Catholic Primary School

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Our Lady of the Angels Catholic Primary School


Name Our Lady of the Angels Catholic Primary School
Website http://ourladyoftheangels.eschools.co.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Requires improvement
Inspection Date 10 July 2018
Address Queensway, Chelston, Torquay, Devon, TQ2 6DB
Phone Number 01803613095
Type Academy
Age Range 4-11
Religious Character Roman Catholic
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 169 (55% boys 45% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 18.8
Academy Sponsor Plymouth Cast
Local Authority Torbay
Percentage Free School Meals 29%
Percentage English is Not First Language 16%
Persisitent Absence 21.1%
Pupils with SEN Support 20.1%
Catchment Area Information Available Yes, our catchment area data is FREE
Last Distance Offered Information Available No

Information about this school

Our Lady of the Angels Catholic Primary School is a smaller than average primary school. It is part of the Plymouth CAST. The trust formed in April 2014. The work of the trust is overseen by a board of directors. The trust is responsible for one nursery, 32 primary schools and two secondary schools across seven local authorities in the south west region. Our Lady of the Angels Catholic Primary School has changed its name from Queensway Catholic Primary School. Queensway Catholic Primary School was judged to be inadequate in October 2016. Since this time the school has seen many staff changes, including leadership. The interim headteacher has been in post since February 2018 and has a long-term contract to lead the school. Internal support from the trust has been wide-ranging in the last year. There have been changes to the way the school improvement function is implemented in the trust this year. A specialist leader of education for early years has supported the school this year. Education standards officers have provided a comprehensive menu for training and support for governors. The school has one class for each year group. The proportion of pupils who are supported through the pupil premium funding is above the national average. The proportion of pupils who have SEN/and or disabilities is above the national average. In 2017 the school did not meet the government’s floor standards, which are the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress at the end of Year 6.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a school that requires improvement This is an improving school. It provides an adequate education for its pupils. It has steadily overcome many of the challenges it has faced in the recent past. Rates of progress for all pupils have improved considerably. However, the progress of some disadvantaged pupils and boys remains too inconsistent in some classes. Teaching, including in the early years, has improved but it is not yet good. Teachers do not use their assessments of what pupils know, can do and understand to adapt their teaching quickly enough to maximise pupils’ learning. Pupils and children do not have sufficient opportunity to practise, consolidate and deepen their learning. This limits some middle-attaining and most-able pupils’ progress. Persistent absenteeism is reducing but too many disadvantaged pupils do not attend well. Year 1 pupils use their phonics skills to read individual words well, but pupils’ application of phonics when reading books independently is not yet good enough. Some pupils’ reading books are not closely matched to their ability. This limits pupils’ fluency when reading aloud. Teaching in a range of foundation subjects is too variable. Teaching does not ensure that pupils’ conceptual understanding of history and geography is developed sufficiently. Leaders are taking appropriate action to improve the provision for pupils who have special educational needs (SEN) and/or disabilities. However, this work is recent. Inconsistencies in these pupils’ academic provision remains. Internal support from the trust has bolstered governors’ capacity to hold leaders to account. This recent work is yet to become established. The school has the following strengths The interim headteacher has enabled swift improvement. School-wide expectations of what pupils can achieve have increased. Leaders are transparent in their communication to staff who seek to continually improve their teaching. A persistent yet collegial approach results in high staff morale. Pupils’ progress and attainment in reading, writing and mathematics have improved steeply at the end of key stage 2. Teaching mathematical fluency, reasoning and problem-solving is strong in many classes. Pupils who have previously underachieved are making good progress to catch up.