Overfields Primary School


Name Overfields Primary School
Website http://overfields.ironstoneacademy.org.uk/
Inspections
Ofsted Inspections
Address Daisy Lane, Ormesby, Middlesbrough, TS7 9JF
Phone Number 01642314548
Type Academy
Age Range 3-11
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 218 (51.8% boys 48.2% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 16.5
Academy Sponsor Ironstone Academy Trust
Local Authority Redcar and Cleveland
Percentage Free School Meals 52.4%
Percentage English is Not First Language 2.3%
Persistent Absence 12.8%
Pupils with SEN Support 8.7%%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Inspection

Information about this school

Overfields Primary is smaller than the average-sized primary school. Overfields is a member of Aspire Learning Partnership, a trust consisting of 8 primary schools who work together.

The trust is governed by a board of directors. Overfields Primary school has its own governing body. The Chair of Governors and headteacher are directors of the trust.

The proportion of disadvantaged pupils, those eligible for the pupil premium, is much higher than the national average. (The pupil premium is additional funding the school receives for those pupils who are known to be eligible for free school meals, and those children who are looked after by the local authority.) The vast majority of pupils are of White British heritage and speak English as their first language.

The proportion of disabled pupils and those who have special educational needs is slightly higher than that found nationally. The school has a speech and language unit which takes part-time and full time pupils from Redcar and Cleveland and Middlesbrough schools. These pupils are dual registered with their home school and their national test results are not included in the school's results.

The early years is taught as a unit and includes full time reception and part time nursery aged children. The school meets the current floor standard, which is the government's minimum expectation for attainment and progress in English and mathematics at the end of Year 6. The school has gained a number of awards, most recently a bronze school games award and is working towards 'Enhanced Healthy School' status.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. Leadership and management are good. Leaders, including governors, have tackled all of the issues from the previous inspection well so that the school is now good.

Leaders regularly check pupils' progress and the quality of teaching. This helps them to know how well the school is doing in order to address any weaker areas. As a result, the achievement of pupils and the quality of teaching have both improved and are now good.

Teachers plan activities that engage the interests of pupils. They use their good subject knowledge to explain new work clearly and ask questions in a way that deepens pupils' understanding. Pupils make good progress in reading because : they enjoy it and are taught well at school.

They are inspired by the reward system for home reading where they receive their own book when they have read one hundred times at home. Pupils' achievement in writing has improved considerably so that it is now good. Standards are now much closer to the national average.

Pupils also make good progress in mathematics. Standards have improved over the last three years and are broadly average. Pupils in the speech and language unit make outstanding progress.

This is because teachers match learning activities exceptionally well to pupils' individual needs. Children make good progress in the early years. Adults provide many interesting and exciting activities indoors and out.

This helps children to learn well across all areas of the curriculum. Pupils are happy, polite and caring towards each other. They work hard in lessons and want to do their best.

The vast majority of pupils behave well around the school, at lunch and play times. Pupils say they feel safe. They have lots of opportunities to learn how to stay safe, for example on the internet, and by talking to trusted adults.

It is not yet an outstanding school because : Teaching is not outstanding because the most able pupils are not always challenged enough. Teachers do not always make sure that all pupils have opportunities to learn from their mistakes and improve their work. Communication with parents is not consistently good so that a small number of parents lack confidence in the school's work.