Selby Abbey Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School

About Selby Abbey Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School Browse Features

Selby Abbey Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School


Name Selby Abbey Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School
Website http://www.selbyabbeyprimaryschool.co.uk/
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Address New Lane, Selby, YO8 4QB
Phone Number 01757703817
Type Primary
Age Range 2-11
Religious Character Church of England
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 342 (51.5% boys 48.5% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 22.3
Local Authority North Yorkshire
Percentage Free School Meals 21.6%
Percentage English is Not First Language 16.7%
Persistent Absence 9.2%
Pupils with SEN Support 16.7%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (29 January 2013)
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Information about this school

Selby Abbey Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary school is larger than the average sized primary school. Pupils are predominantly white. Almost three quarters are White British with one quarter of White Other heritage, mostly from Eastern Europe with many Polish pupils. The proportion of pupils for whom English is not their first language is typical of that normally found. The proportion of pupils known to be eligible for the pupil premium funding is above average. The proportion of pupils supported by school action is average, although the proportion supported by school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs is well above average. In 2012, the school exceeded the government’s current floor standards, which set the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. The achievement of pupils is good and improving with pupils making particularly good progress in English and mathematics. Teaching is well planned to meet the needs of all learners and makes skilled use of teaching assistants. There is excellent support for pupils at risk of falling behind through the school’s involvement of teachers, teaching assistants and parents in its assertive mentoring and nurture work. Pupils who qualify for the pupil premium perform well such that gaps are narrower than those typically found in other schools. Pupils’ behaviour is good. Pupils and staff treat each other with respect in a caring cohesive community. The school’s Christian ethos and regular opportunities for worship and reflection provide good opportunities for the spiritual and moral development of pupils. School leaders at all levels, including governors, are ambitious for the school and there is strong staff commitment to achieving the best for their pupils. School senior leaders have an accurate view of the quality of teaching and pupils’ achievement and have secured improvement such that it is now good. The school has a good understanding of the community it serves and offers valuable support for families of pupils with particular needs. It is not yet an outstanding school because : While teaching is consistently good there is not enough teaching that is outstanding. Too few pupils reach the highest standards particularly in their writing. The recently implemented scheme for reading through letter and sound recognition is not yet securely embedded in order to have an impact on all pupils.