St John’s Church of England Academy

About St John’s Church of England Academy Browse Features

St John’s Church of England Academy


Name St John’s Church of England Academy
Website http://www.stjohns.covmat.org
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Address Winsford Avenue, Coventry, CV5 9HZ
Phone Number 02476674092
Type Academy
Age Range 4-11
Religious Character Church of England
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 212 (50.5% boys 49.5% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 19.0
Academy Sponsor Diocese Of Coventry
Local Authority Coventry
Percentage Free School Meals 6.1%
Percentage English is Not First Language 7.2%
Persisitent Absence 2.7%
Pupils with SEN Support 10%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (17 January 2013)
There may have been more recent inspections such as monitoring visits or short inspections. For details of all inspections, please view this provider on our map here.
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.

Information about this school

The school is smaller than the average-sized primary school. Just over 10 per cent of pupils are from a minority ethnic background but almost all speak English as their first language. The proportion of pupils known to be eligible for the pupil premium, which is additional funding for children in local authority care and pupils known to be eligible for free school meals, is below average. The proportions of pupils supported through school action, school action plus or a statement of special educational needs are all broadly average. The school meets the government’s current floor standards, which set the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress. A new deputy headteacher started in September 2012. The before- and after-school club, called the Ewe Club, is organised and managed by the governing body. It is included in the inspection.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. Children make good progress in Reception because teaching for them is consistently good. Effective leadership ensures close links with local nursery settings and that all staff work together well. Pupils of all ages do particularly well in reading because of the excellent start they have in Reception, linking letters and sounds (Phonics). Reading is effectively taught throughout the school. Learning is effective in all Key Stage 1 and 2 lessons because teaching is consistently good and occasionally outstanding. Teachers plan interesting and challenging tasks that motivate pupils and make learning fun. Behaviour is good in lessons and around school. Pupils feel safe because of the excellent family atmosphere generated by all adults in this caring and friendly school. The headteacher has deservedly won the confidence of everyone and staff share his vision to create an outstanding school. Regular checks on teaching by all senior leaders and checks on pupils’ progress by all staff are helping to raise standards. Governance is good. Governors use their considerable expertise to ask senior leaders searching questions about how well the school is doing. This contributes to the good capacity to improve. It is not yet an outstanding school because : The progress of a minority of pupils who have special educational needs is not rapid enough in some lessons and as a result, their attainment compares unfavourably with similar pupils in other schools. Too few governors are involved in checking on school improvement and reports of their visits to school are not always produced.