Tenterden Church of England Junior School

About Tenterden Church of England Junior School Browse Features

Tenterden Church of England Junior School


Name Tenterden Church of England Junior School
Website http://www.tenterdenprimaryfederation.kent.sch.uk/
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Address Recreation Ground Road, Tenterden, TN30 6RA
Phone Number 01580763717
Type Academy
Age Range 7-11
Religious Character Church of England
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 208 (49% boys 51% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 21.6
Academy Sponsor Tenterden Schools Trust
Local Authority Kent
Percentage Free School Meals 21.6%
Percentage English is Not First Language 9.7%
Persistent Absence 7.5%
Pupils with SEN Support 12.2%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (10 January 2013)
There may have been more recent inspections such as monitoring visits or short inspections. For details of all inspections, please view this provider on our map here.
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.

Information about this school

Tenterden is an average-sized junior school. In September 2012, the school formed a federation with the neighbouring infant school, whose headteacher is now the executive headteacher of both schools. Each school has a deputy headteacher and both schools share the same governing body. Most pupils are of White British heritage. The proportion of disabled pupils and those who have special educational needs supported at school action is above average. The proportion supported at school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs is below average. The proportion of pupils for whom the school receives additional government funding (the pupil premium) is below average but increasing year on year. The school meets the government’s current floor standard, which sets the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress. The school uses no alternative provision.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. The headteacher and other school leaders have successfully improved the school since the previous inspection. Most pupils make good progress throughout the school and are on track to reach improved standards by the end of Year 6. Teaching has improved and is now good so that pupils achieve well. Pupils enjoy coming to school, as shown by their above-average attendance. They are polite and well behaved and have excellent attitudes to learning. Pupils have a good understanding of how to keep themselves safe. They feel they are all treated fairly. There are very good relationships between pupils and staff. The headteacher leads the school very effectively and has created a strong team of senior leaders and staff who share the ambition and drive to raise standards. Regular and thorough checks are made on the quality of teaching and pupils’ progress. Leaders quickly identify and support any teaching that does not meet their high expectations. The governing body is effective in supporting and challenging the school. It is not yet an outstanding school because : There is not enough outstanding teaching and so not enough pupils are making as much progress as they could. There are too few opportunities for teachers to share outstanding teaching. Some lessons do not provide enough demanding work for more able pupils. Standards in mathematics are not as good as they are in English because work is not pitched at the right level for pupils of all abilities. Pupils are not always clear about how they can improve their work.