The March CofE Primary School


Name The March CofE Primary School
Website http://www.march.w-sussex.sch.uk/
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Address Claypit Lane, Westhampnett, Chichester, PO18 0NU
Phone Number 01243783987
Type Academy
Age Range 4-11
Religious Character Church of England
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 202 (51% boys 49% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 22.1
Academy Sponsor Diocese Of Chichester Academy Trust
Local Authority West Sussex
Percentage Free School Meals 6.9%
Percentage English is Not First Language 3.4%
Persistent Absence 2.8%
Pupils with SEN Support 9.3%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (08 October 2014)
There may have been more recent inspections such as monitoring visits or short inspections. For details of all inspections, please view this provider on our map here.
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.

Information about this school

The school is smaller than the average sized primary school. Children in the Early Years Foundation Stage attend full-time in the Reception class. Most pupils are of White British heritage, with under 10% from a range of minority ethnic groups. Very few pupils speak English as an additional language. The proportion of disadvantaged pupils eligible for the pupil premium is below average. The pupil premium provides additional funding for children who are in the care of the local authority or those known to be eligible for free school meals. The proportion of disabled pupils and those who have special educational needs supported through school action is broadly average. The proportion supported through school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs is below average. These needs relate mainly to moderate learning difficulties. The school meets the government?s current floor standards, which set the minimum expectations for pupils? attainment and progress. A new deputy headteacher and a new special educational needs coordinator were appointed in September 2014. The headteacher plays a leading role in supporting schools in the local school network.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school The headteacher, well supported by the governors and all staff, has tackled weaknesses and brought about improvements in pupils? achievement. School leaders have sustained good teaching over a period of time so that pupils achieve well. Overall standards at the end of Key Stage 2 are above average and rising. Effective leadership and management are evident at all levels. Staff and governors are united in their clear vision for moving the school forward. Consequently, the school is well placed to improve even further. Pupils make good progress in reading, writing and mathematics. Gaps in achievement are closing for disadvantaged pupils, particularly at Key Stage 2. Pupils enjoy school, behave well and take pride in their school. They are very positive about learning and respond enthusiastically to the stimulating curriculum. They are kept safe and are looked after well. A shared set of values and strong emphasis on rights and responsibilities contribute very strongly to pupils? spiritual, moral, social and cultural development. Children make good progress in the Early Years Foundation Stage. This is due to effective teaching which encourages children?s curiosity and eagerness to learn. It is not yet an outstanding school because : Pupils? achievement in mathematics in Key Stage 1 is not as good as that in reading and writing. Teachers sometimes move on to new work too quickly before pupils have fully grasped an idea.