Victoria Academy


Name Victoria Academy
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Inspection Date 08 July 2014
Address Devonshire Road, Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, LA14 5NE
Phone Number 01229894656
Type Primary
Age Range 7-11
Religious Character Does not apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 193 (50% boys 50% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 20.5
Academy Sponsor Furness Education Trust
Local Authority Cumbria
Percentage Free School Meals 13.9%
Percentage English is Not First Language 2.6%
Persisitent Absence 5.4%
Pupils with SEN Support 13.5%
Catchment Area Information Available Yes, our catchment area data is FREE
Last Distance Offered Information Available No

Information about this school

This school is smaller than most primary schools. The proportion of pupils known to be eligible for support through the pupil premium (additional funding for pupils known to be eligible for free school meals and those looked after by the local authority) is well below the national average. The proportion of pupils supported at school action is above the national average. The proportion of pupils supported at school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs is below that usually found. The majority of pupils are of White British heritage and speak English as their first language. The headteacher is a local Leader of Education. She is instrumental in leading initiatives such as developing the school curriculum through links with local businesses. Most pupils join the school from a nearby infant school, though approximately 20% join from other schools. Staff at school work closely with staff at Newbridge House, which is an alternative provider used by the school. The school meets the government’s current floor standard, which is the minimum expectation for pupils’ attainment and progress in reading, writing and mathematics by the end of Year 6.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. Pupils’ behaviour is exceptional; they are extremely helpful and polite, showing respect for each other and the adults around them. Pupils feel safe in school because staff care for them very well. Achievement is good. Attainment at the end of Year 6 is above average in reading, writing and mathematics. Pupils make good progress from their individual starting points. Teaching is good. Pupils enjoy an interesting range of activities and as soon as they show confidence at one level, they are challenged to step up to the next level. Teachers and teaching assistants work well together to provide a good level of support to pupils with special educational needs. School leaders have established excellent relationships with local colleges and businesses. This adds a further dimension to the exciting curriculum that includes a wide range of inspiring experiences for all pupils. Pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is promoted very well. Pupils strive to do their best in sports and artistic pursuits. The school is well led and managed. The headteacher, all leaders, governors and staff share the aim to provide the very best for all pupils in the school. School leaders, including governors, are maintaining the quality of teaching and actions are improving pupils’ achievement still further. It is not yet an outstanding school because : Marking does not always highlight errors, especially in spelling, so pupils do not learn from their mistakes. Information regarding pupils’ progress is not always summarised precisely enough to check on the progress of different groups of pupils. Consequently, it is not always easy to compare the progress of different groups with similar groups nationally to ensure they are making the progress expected of them.