Yew Tree Primary Academy


Name Yew Tree Primary Academy
Website http://www.yewtreeknowsley.co.uk/
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Address The Avenue, Halewood, Knowsley, L26 1UU
Phone Number 01514778950
Type Academy
Age Range 3-11
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 247 (59.5% boys 40.5% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 14.2
Academy Sponsor Wade Deacon Trust
Local Authority Knowsley
Percentage Free School Meals 39.5%
Percentage English is Not First Language 4%
Persisitent Absence 18%
Pupils with SEN Support 29.4%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (17 December 2013)
There may have been more recent inspections such as monitoring visits or short inspections. For details of all inspections, please view this provider on our map here.
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.

Information about this school

This school is smaller than the average-sized primary school. The school was formed in September 2011 from the amalgamation of a primary school and a small special school for pupils with learning and behavioural difficulties. The school has designated special provision (DSP) for pupils with special educational needs. This currently provides for 28 pupils, aged four to 11, who are taught in three classes. They have a range of needs including behavioural, emotional and social difficulties, speech and language difficulties and autistic spectrum conditions. The proportion of disabled pupils and those who have special educational needs supported through school action is lower than average. The proportion who are supported at school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs is around three times higher than the national average. The local authority’s special educational needs outreach service, which provides support for other local schools, is located in the school. More than two thirds of pupils are known to be eligible for the pupil premium. This is much higher than the national average. (The pupil premium is the additional funding for pupils known to be eligible for free school meals, the children of service families, and for children in local authority care.) The proportion of pupils who join the school at times other than the usual points is around twice as high as the national average. The very large majority of pupils are of White British heritage and speak English as their home language. The school runs a breakfast club in the mornings, which was included in this inspection. The school has gained the Inclusion Quality Mark. The school meets the government’s current floor standards, which set the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress in English and mathematics.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. Pupils make good progress and achieve well across the school. Teaching is typically at least good, and an increasing amount is outstanding. Teachers know their pupils well and plan interesting lessons for them. Pupils learn to read successfully. Pupils in the designated special provision (DSP) classes make good progress because of the intensive specialist support they receive. Pupils behave well in school. They feel safe, work hard and want to do well. The headteacher, well supported by his senior leadership team, has high expectations of all pupils and staff. School leaders monitor the quality of teaching very carefully. Governors know the school well. They both support school leaders and challenge them to improve the school further. The school has good relationships with parents, who are very supportive of the school and its leaders. It is not yet an outstanding school because : The quality of teaching is not yet outstanding. The outdoor area is not a stimulating environment where children in the Early Years Foundation Stage can readily learn by exploring for themselves. Pupils do not have many chances to act on the advice they are given in teachers’ marking so they can improve their work. Teachers do not regularly have the chance to observe the practice of their outstanding colleagues. There is some inconsistency by staff in the use of the visual communication system in the DSP classes.