Pearl Hyde Community Primary School

About Pearl Hyde Community Primary School Browse Features

Pearl Hyde Community Primary School


Name Pearl Hyde Community Primary School
Website http://www.pearlhyde.co.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.
Address Dorchester Way, Clifford Park, Coventry, CV2 2NB
Phone Number 02476610165
Type Academy
Age Range 4-11
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 266 (48.9% boys 51.1% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 25.5
Academy Sponsor Finham Park Multi-Academy Trust
Local Authority Coventry
Percentage Free School Meals 9.4%
Percentage English is Not First Language 40.9%
Persisitent Absence 9.1%
Pupils with SEN Support 9.6%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Full Inspection (10 March 2015)
There may have been more recent inspections such as monitoring visits or short inspections. For details of all inspections, please view this provider on our map here.
This inspection rating relates to a predecessor school. When a school, converts to an academy, is taken over or closes and reopens as a new school a formal link is created between the new school and the old school, by the Department for Education. Where the new school has not yet been inspected, we show the inspection history of the predecessor school, as we believe it still has significance.

Information about this school

The school is larger than the average-sized primary school. The proportion of pupils from minority ethnic groups is well above average and makes up over 60% of the school’s population; of these the largest groups are pupils of Indian and other Asian backgrounds. Nearly half of the school’s pupils speak English as an additional language, which is well above the national average. The proportion of pupils supported by the pupil premium funding, which provides support for disadvantaged pupils, is well below the national average. The proportion of disabled pupils and those who have special educational needs is broadly average. Children in the Reception Year attend full-time. The school meets the government’s current floor standards, which set the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress in reading, writing and mathematics by the end of Year 6. Since the previous inspection, the school has experienced changes in leadership and staffing. The headteacher took up her post in September 2012. The school shares its site with a privately run nursery. Part of the school’s accommodation is used by privately run before- and after-school provision. As these facilities are not managed by the school’s governing body, they are subject to separate inspection.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. Leadership and management are good. Leaders, including governors, strive for excellence and set clear priorities for improvement. They have ensured that pupils’ achievement and the quality of teaching are good and are continuing to improve. Leaders carefully track the progress made by every pupil and keep a close check on their well-being. The school has a strong ethos of tolerance. Cultural diversity is celebrated. Pupils get on well together and behaviour is good. Systems to keep pupils safe are effective and pupils say they feel safe. Teaching is good. Teachers have high expectations, both of pupils’ behaviour and what they should achieve in lessons. Pupils achieve well. By the end of Year 6, standards in reading and writing are above average. Pupils’ attainment in mathematics is high. Children in the Reception classes make good progress and achieve well. It is not yet an outstanding school because : Less-able pupils do not do quite as well in writing as they do in reading and mathematics. Teachers’ comments about pupils’ writing are not always clear enough to help the less-able pupils to improve quickly. Leaders do not always take full account of the information they have about pupils’ progress when they check the impact of teaching on pupils’ learning.